TU Delft ‘NWO Complexity in Transport & Logistics’ proposals granted

News - 01 December 2016

The next two topics had the TU Delft as main applicant: 

Universality and resilience in logistics networks: a mean field approach

In the near future the logistics network will experience a number of challenges imposed by the technological developments, such as autonomous travelling of containers and vehicles. Therefore the logistics network has to exhibit resilience, which we will investigate combining a universal one-dimensional mean-field description and choice behaviour modelling.

TU Delft researchers: Johan Dubbeldam (EWI), Caspar Chorus (TBM).

Trans-SONIC: Transport Self Organization through Network Integration and Collaboration

Due to accumulating disruptions the Dutch railway operations can get out-of-control. Modelling the railways as a complex system can reveal the underlying interactions causing this. Using that insight we seek early warning signals for such situations, and accordingly, improved counter-measures leading to a more resilient service.The Trans-SONIC project will develop and test technological and organizational solutions for setting-up integrated, seamless multimodal transport services. These services are key for delivering goods between mainports and the hinterland in a sustainable way. Core innovations that will be researched are sensor and interaction technologies and incentives for self-organization.

TU Delft researchers: Alexander Verbraeck (TBM) and Heide Lukosch (TBM)

The following topics had the TU Delft as co-applicant:

Complexity Methods for Predictive Synchromodality (Comet-PS)

Manufacturing high-tech systems requires the joint effort of some hundred teams of specialized engineers employed by dozens of companies. The process is somehow orchestrated by coordinating deliveries between upstream and downstream teams. We investigate and prescribe how teams should coordinate deliveries such that responsive, resilient and cost-effective supply chains emerge.

TU Delft researchers: Jan Kwakkel (TBM), Alexander Verbraeck (TBM).

Complexity Methods for Predictive Synchromodality (Comet-PS)

Synchromodality is a promising concept that enables us to optimize the efficiency of freight transportation supply chains, one of the key drivers of the Dutch economy. In this project we develop and evaluate methods to exploit the full potential of synchromodality, leading to dramatic reductions in cost and emissions.

TU Delftresearcher: Rudy Negenborn (3mE) 

Improving the resilience of railway systems

Due to accumulating disruptions the Dutch railway operations can get out-of-control. Modelling the railways as a complex system can reveal the underlying interactions causing this. Using that insight we seek early warning signals for such situations, and accordingly, improved counter-measures leading to a more resilient service.

TU Delft researcher: Rob Goverde (CiTG)

SWARMPORT

In seaports, many different activities are needed to service a ship. Because of the sheer number of services, the many relations between them and the sensitivity to external disruptions, the system is complex and difficult to manage. We develop quantitative models that make the overall service quality easier to improve.

TU Delft researchers: Lóri Tavasszy (TBM) and Ron van Duin (TBM)

Read more about the granted proposals and the collaboration between universities at the NWO website.