News

11 April 2022

Feeling things by touching the screen of your smartphone

Feeling things by touching the screen of your smartphone

Imagine you could feel the brush strokes of Van Gogh, the fur of your beloved pet on a zoom call, fabrics in online shopping or tissues in medical images. Yasemin Vardar, assistant professor at the department of Cognitive Robotics (CoR), wants to enable this breakthrough by developing friction-modulation haptic displays. This week she received Veni funding from NWO for her research idea.

21 March 2022

David Abbink, Timo Melman en Niek Beckers in various media

17 March 2022

ERC Grants for Daniel Tam and Javier Alonso-Mora

ERC Grants for Daniel Tam and Javier Alonso-Mora

Javier Alonso-Mora at the Department of Cognitive Robotics (CoR) has been awarded a European Research Council (ERC) Starting Grant, while Daniel Tam at the Department of Process and Energy (P&E) has been awarded an ERC Consolidator Grant.

24 February 2022

TU Delft develops a car that can ‘look into the future’ with smart eco mode

TU Delft develops a car that can ‘look into the future’ with smart eco mode

Together with Renault, Delft robot engineers developed the Proactive Eco Mode, a new system that enables drivers to reach the desired speed faster, based on predictions of the future, while maintaining the eco fuel benefits. They have successfully demonstrated the system on French roads.

24 January 2022

Wilbert Tabone in various media

24 January 2022

Dariu Gavrila in various media

23 December 2021

Obstacles no problem for smart robots

Obstacles no problem for smart robots

Robots that safely navigate busy corridors to deliver medicines to nurses. And drones that manoeuvre around people, rubbish bins and poles without smashing things up. This is possible thanks to the models developed by researcher Javier Alonso-Mora.

13 December 2021

Michaël Wiertlewski in various media

03 December 2021

Grip or slip; robots need a human sense of touch

Grip or slip; robots need a human sense of touch

How can humans instantly estimate the slipperiness of a surface and adjust their gripping, for instance when picking up a wet glass? Researchers have demonstrated that a (radial) strain of the skin of the fingertip is involved in the perception of slipperiness during initial contact. Robotics could use this information, for instance to improve prosthetics and grippers. The results will be published in PNAS.

18 November 2021

David Abbink in various media

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