Latest News

16 January 2020

Digital engine room in the towing tank

As a result of stricter environment regulation, ships will have to use renewable fuels more frequently in the future instead of diesel. This means that the familiar ship diesel engines will be gradually replaced by new technologies, such as gas engines and fuel cells. Often these systems have already been tested on land, but are they also safe for use in the open sea? To find answers to these questions, research Arthur Vrijdag and PhD candidate Lode Huijgens, who work at the Department of Maritime and Transport Technology (MTT), developed a globally unique Propeller Open Water (POW) setup.

16 December 2019

TU Delft works to create a natural gas-free built environment

The consortium WarmingUp, a new collective endeavouring to accelerate the creation of cost-effective and sustainable heating networks, has been awarded a grant worth €9.3 million by the Netherlands Enterprise Agency (RVO) as part of its Long-Term Mission-Driven Innovation Programme (MMIP). Under the leadership of TNO, TU Delft has joined forces with other key players in the field of affordable and sustainable heat to form WarmingUp. The partners themselves are investing €9.5 million in its research programme.

12 December 2019

Millions for large-scale energy storage research

12 December 2019

Heike Vallery professor of innovative rehabilitation technology at EMC

Heike Vallery, professor of human motor augmentation, has been named honorary professor of innovative rehabilitation technology at the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at Erasmus MC. This appointment underscores the importance of innovative rehabilitation technology in health care and is an important milestone in connecting technology and medicine.

10 December 2019

ERC Consolidator Grant for better energy conversion

TU Delft researcher Dr. Rene Pecnik has been awarded an ERC Consolidator Grant for his research into energy conversion

10 December 2019

Combination of microscopy techniques makes images twice as sharp

Researchers at Delft University of Technology have combined two existing super-resolution microscopy techniques to create a new method. Many experts thought that combining these techniques was not technically possible. The new, combined method enables researchers to visualize the tiny components of living cells better than ever before. Among other things, this can lead to new insights for healthcare.

05 December 2019

Towards single-cell biopsy with 3D printing

Murali Ghatkesar, assistant professor in the Department of Precision and Microsystems Engineering, has developed a new method through 3D printing that makes it easier, quicker and more efficient to perform single-cell biopsies. It is the first time that 3D printing is being used for the production of micro- and nanofluidic equipment. The results of his research were published in the scientific journal Lab on a Chip this month.

04 December 2019

Microchip for room temperature quantum internet

A key requirement for a future quantum internet is that it will be widely accessible and affordable. This requires the ability to prepare mechanical systems in their lowest possible energy state (the quantum ground state) without expensive cryogenics.

21 November 2019

‘Ruler-less measuring’ at crime scenes

Researchers at TU Delft and the Netherlands Forensic Institute (NFI) have developed a new ‘ruler-less prototype’ that may make the use of a physical ruler at the crime scene redundant.

15 November 2019

How to Expand and Contract Curved Surfaces of all Shapes

Researchers at TU Delft have designed a dilation method that can be applied to any curved surface. The range of applications include medical braces for children, expandable furniture, or aortic stents.