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14 July 2021

Swarm of autonomous tiny drones can localize gas leaks

Swarm of autonomous tiny drones can localize gas leaks

Researchers from TU Delft (the Netherlands), University of Barcelona, and Harvard University have now developed the first swarm of tiny – and hence very safe – drones that can autonomously detect and localize gas sources in cluttered indoor environments.

30 June 2021

A new spin on making minimal cells

A new spin on making minimal cells

The ability of a cell to separate its own matter from its surroundings is a basic requirement for life. A team of researchers at AMOLF and Delft University of Technology have managed to create a synthetic container, or lipid vesicle, that is able to hold a range of different biological systems: from a cytoskeleton to entire E.coli bacteria. Their findings on this optimized cDICE method, which has the potential to reveal the inner workings of life, are published in ACS Synthetic Biology on DATE.

29 June 2021

Delft Bioengineering Institute continues

23 June 2021

Portrait Liedewij Laan

Portrait Liedewij Laan

“Last year was a very interesting year. To my mind, TU Delft is a stable environment. COVID-19 meant that without warning, things that had been optimised had to be organised differently. There was suddenly room to be more creative with processes. I found this invigorating. My group showed itself to be very flexible and managed to adapt in no time. In addition to experimenting, we started focusing on modelling and machine learning, for example.

16 June 2021

Lunar Zebro and TNO join forces to pave the way to the Moon

Lunar Zebro and TNO join forces to pave the way to the Moon

Lunar Zebro, an ambitious team at TU Delft will work together with TNO (The Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research) to build the lightest and smallest Moon rover to date.

10 June 2021

ZonMW Team Science funding for Pouyan Boukany and Elizabeth Carroll

27 May 2021

Researchers make 3D image with light microscope

Researchers make 3D image with light microscope

For the first time, Delft researchers have succeeded in making a three-dimensional image of a cellular component using light. The component in question is the nuclear pore complex: tunnels that facilitate traffic to and from the cell nucleus. Studying cell components in 3D can help to determine the cause of various diseases, among other things. The researchers have published their findings in Nature Communications.

27 May 2021

A new tool to understand the brain

A new tool to understand the brain

How does our brain work? An international team of researchers, including lead author Daan Brinks of TU Delft, has taken another step towards answering that question. They have created a new tool that allows them to image electrical signals in brains with an unprecedented combination of precision, resolution, sensitivity, and depth.

17 May 2021

New research shows: Antoni van Leeuwenhoek led rivals astray

New research shows: Antoni van Leeuwenhoek led rivals astray

A microscope used by Antoni van Leeuwenhoek to conduct pioneering research contains a surprisingly ordinary lens, as new research by Rijksmuseum Boerhaave Leiden and TU Delft shows. It is a remarkable finding, because Van Leeuwenhoek (1632-1723) led other scientists to believe that his instruments were exceptional. Consequently, there has been speculation about his method for making lenses for more than three centuries. The results of this study were published in Science Advances on May 14.

11 May 2021

Three TU Delft/Erasmus MC master student projects supported with 2,5k