News

112 results

17 March 2022

Spotlight on aggressive cancer cells

Spotlight on aggressive cancer cells

Metastases in cancer are often caused by a few abnormal cells. These behave more aggressively than the other cancer cells in a tumour. Miao-Ping Chien and Daan Brinks are working together, from two different universities, on a method to detect these cells. Their research has now been published in Nature.

16 March 2022

New Cas9 model maps DNA cutting behaviour for the first time

New Cas9 model maps DNA cutting behaviour for the first time

Researchers from the TU Delft have come up with a physical-based model that establishes a quantitative framework on how gene-editing with CRISPR-Cas9 works, and allows them to predict where, with what probability, and why targeting errors (off-targets) occur. This research, which has been published in Nature Communications, gives us a first detailed physical understanding of the mechanism behind the most important gene editing platform of today.

15 March 2022

Cell unstuck: how a glue-like protein can make our cells move

Cell unstuck: how a glue-like protein can make our cells move

An essential aspect of the cells in our body is their ability to move, to repair certain tissues or chase intruders, for example: but how do they do it? Scientists from TU Delft, AMOLF and Utrecht University reveal how glue-like proteins called crosslinkers could not only help to hold the whole cell together passively, but surprisingly cause the cell to move as well. The research is now published in PNAS.

24 February 2022

Mark van Loosdrecht wins Novozymes Prize for 25 years of revolutionary wastewater treatment

Mark van Loosdrecht wins Novozymes Prize for 25 years of revolutionary wastewater treatment

The development of new technologies for biological wastewater treatment is turning our view of sludge upside down. Microbiologist Mark van Loosdrecht receives the 2022 Novozymes Prize for his pioneering work in copying and reusing nature’s mechanisms in wastewater treatment and resource recovery. Van Loosdrecht: “Treating wastewater will become good business in the future.”

23 February 2022

Signal discovered that connects cell size with cell growth

Signal discovered that connects cell size with cell growth

The mechanisms connecting growth with cell size have been mysterious – up till now: in a recent publication in Current Biology, researchers from TU Delft and AMOLF have uncovered that the signaling molecule ppGpp is essential to regulate cell size. Surprisingly, they also discover cells adjust their sizes to concentrations of ppGpp, rather than strictly according to growth rate.

10 February 2022

TU Delft Story: Solving the worldwide bottleneck in nuclear medicine

10 February 2022

TU Delft Story: Improving biotech production with real-time testing

07 February 2022

ERC Proof of Concept Grant for Arjen Jakobi

ERC Proof of Concept Grant for Arjen Jakobi

Arjen Jakobi (Department of Bionanoscience) receives the ERC Proof of Concept Grant for his groundbreaking research on cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM). "This grant will allow us to take our new CryoChip technique for high resolution images of protein molecules to the next level for the development of new drugs," says Jakobi.

11 January 2022

ERC Starting Grants for two 3mE projects

ERC Starting Grants for two 3mE projects

Sabina Caneva and Richard Norte, researchers of the department of Precision and Microsystems Engineering, have been awarded an ERC Starting Grant by the European Research Council.

23 December 2021

Super-fast technique measures heme enzyme reaction as it happens

Super-fast technique measures heme enzyme reaction as it happens

Researchers from TU Delft found an unexpected new enzyme intermediate at work in enzymes that contain heme, a cofactor that’s vital for many processes in our body such as the breaking down of toxins in the liver. The researchers used new, rapid techniques, which are less invasive than existing methods. The results, published in ACS Catalysis, increase our understanding of heme proteins and enzymes and how they can be engineered.

/* */