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22 March 2021

Decoding movement intentions in the brain using ultrasound waves

Decoding movement intentions in the brain using ultrasound waves

An international team of scientists that includes ImPhys researcher David Maresca published an article in Neuron today demonstrating decoding of movement intentions in the brain using ultrasound. The work shows great promises for the development of less invasive brain-machine interfaces.

08 March 2021

New test makes detection of genetic material visible to the naked eye

New test makes detection of genetic material visible to the naked eye

Onderzoekers van de TU Delft hebben een test ontwikkeld waarmee ze specifieke stukjes genetisch materiaal kunnen opsporen, waarna de uitslag met het blote oog af te lezen is. Met de test kunnen onder meer virussen, zoals het coronavirus, en antibioticaresistente bacteriën snel en goedkoop worden gedetecteerd. De resultaten zijn gepubliceerd in Biophysical Journal.

25 January 2021

How wastewater treatment technologies could also be applied in the field of medicine

How wastewater treatment technologies could also be applied in the field of medicine

Winnifred Noorlander, a Systems & Control student with a passion for entrepreneurship, is working on a new medicine for the treatment of sepsis, a life-threatening response of the body to an infection. Sepsis is responsible for 20% of all global deaths, resulting in 11 million people dying each year. How is a student, without having any prior knowledge on Biotechnology, doing this research at the faculty of Applied Sciences? Why is she working on a more reliable and better solution against this extremely lethal inflammatory disease?

11 January 2021

Delft researchers build artificial chromosome

Delft researchers build artificial chromosome

Biotechnologists at Delft University of Technology have built an artificial chromosome in yeast. The chromosome can exist alongside the natural yeast chromosomes, and serves as a platform to safely and easily add new functions to the micro-organism. Researchers can use the artificial chromosome to convert yeast cells into living factories capable of producing useful chemicals and even medicines.

07 January 2021

ERC Proof of Concept grant for Frank Hollmann

ERC Proof of Concept grant for Frank Hollmann

Frank Hollmann (Biotechnology) has been awarded a Proof of Concept grant by the European Research Council. He is one of 55 ERC grant holders that are set to receive top-up funding to explore the commercial or innovation potential of the results of their EU-funded research.

17 December 2020

Delft researchers chart the potential risks of 'free-floating DNA'

Delft researchers chart the potential risks of 'free-floating DNA'

We don’t realize it, but loose strands of DNA end up in nature via our wastewater. As of yet, it is unclear how much this 'free-floating DNA' impacts environmental and public health. Researchers at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) have now found a way to determine just how much potentially harmful DNA ends up in our wastewater. They have developed a method that can isolate such ‘free floating DNA’ from wastewater, which gives them the means to determine the extent of the problem. The results of their work will officially be printed in Water Research in February 2021, but have already been pre-published online.

15 December 2020

Five 20k grants for cross-campus bioengineering research projects

01 December 2020

Best Bioengineering MSc Graduate 2020: Nemo Andrea!

01 December 2020

Delft researchers develop blood oxygenation sensor for premature babies

Delft researchers develop blood oxygenation sensor for premature babies

Doctors have to keep a close eye on babies that are born prematurely, and brain oxygenation is perhaps the most important thing to monitor. Up to 50 percent of premature babies suffer brain damage, leading to neurological problems. Researchers at Delft University of Technology have now developed a wireless sensor that monitors the health of the baby's brain in a simple, inexpensive and comfortable way for the child.

01 December 2020

Researchers peer deep inside tissue

Researchers peer deep inside tissue

One of the challenges in optical imaging is imaging the inside of tissue in high resolution. Traditional methods allow us to look to a depth of approximately one millimetre. Researchers at Delft University of Technology have now developed a new method that can penetrate up to four times as deep: up to around four millimetres. The healthcare sector in particular may benefit from the new technique in the future.

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