Vacancies

The TU Delft is world leader in the hydraulic engineering field. We are actively looking for an enthusiastic Assistant Professor to contribute to our research and education activities starting september 2018.

You will be active in the field of coastal structures, which includes rubble mound breakwaters, closure dams, bed protections and other shoreline protection measures. Topics of interest include the analysis of (wave) boundary conditions, improving understanding of the underlying physical processes, application of (probabilistic) design methods, physical modelling, and development and application of CFD for coastal structures. You will combine a strong theoretical profundity with the ability to educate our students to become professional designers, engineers and scientists in this field. We are looking for a team player, who enjoys a broad scope of fundamental and applied research and has a genuine interest in teaching.


We are looking for an enthusiastic Assistant Professor starting September 2018 in the department Hydraulic Engineering (research group: Ports and  Waterways (P&W).

P&W is one of the specialisations within the track Hydraulic Engineering (Master Civil Engineering). The multi-disciplinary specialisation focusses on integrated planning and design of ports, terminals, and inland waterways, wherein operational, logistic, economic, environmental, safety and hydraulic aspects are addressed. P&W is closely linked to other specialisations within the track and aspires to keep its research lines and education activities updated to be at the forefront of new trends and developments. Nautical traffic models and simulations play an increasingly important role in the planning of ports and waterways, more so due to the current trend towards digitalization and availbility of big data.

Responsibilities include:

  • Education: Organizing and contributing to the courses in P&W through lectures, updating of lecture notes and course material, assisting with incorporation of modern teaching techniques in P&W courses, and co-supervising BSc and MSc students.

  • Research: initiating, and conducting research in the above mentioned fields; setting up and developing your own line of research. Research is fundamental and application inspired; the latter will be defined in consultation with end users such as Port Authorities, Industry and Ministries.

  • Valorization: The candidate is expected to work towards acquisition of  funding for projects through cooperation with the private sector, government and/or EU or Dutch national projects and research grants.

  • Organization: A small portion of the positions’ responsibilities is devoted to management activities in the department or faculty, e.g. participation in department and faculty committees.

Deltas, under pressure from climate change and increasing human activities, are undergoing transitions in their abiotic and biotic systems. Especially when the pressures exceed certain thresholds substantial or even irreversible changes (i.e. regime shifts) can take place. The transitions of deltas are complex as human impacts operate on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, while internal buffers and processes in the systems also set specific reaction time scales. Identifying how processes at different spatial scales, involving physical and biological mechanisms and their interaction, shape the resilience of estuarine systems will be adamant to understand and optimize the adaptive capacity of estuaries in an uncertain future.

An extensive research program is set up to identify and determine the relevant thresholds, regimes and time scales, and to explore measures for coping with the transitions. Delft University of Technology is intensively collaborating with State Key Laboratory for Estuaries and Coasts (SKLEC) in Shanghai and Dutch partner Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ) in Yerseke.

This PhD project focuses on tidal flats and aims to unravel the mechanisms responsible for small-scale morphological features (like tidal creeks) on these tidal flats. Furthermore, we want to determine the interaction between these small-scale features and the larger scale morphology. We will do this by (1) carrying out field campaigns in the Dutch systems, but also in collaboration with the Chinese partners, in the Chinese systems; (2) high resolution numerical modelling with Delft3D and XBeach.

Deltas are under pressure due to climate change and increasing human activities, resulting in gradual or rapid changes in their abiotic and biotic systems. Especially when these pressures exceed certain thresholds these changes may be abrupt or even irreversible (i.e. regime shifts). The transitions of deltas are complex as human impacts operate on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, while internal buffers and processes in the systems also set specific reaction time scales. Identifying how relevant physical and biological processes interact at different spatial scales, and thereby shape the resilience of estuarine systems, is crucial for understanding and optimizing the adaptive capacity of estuaries.

An extensive research program is set up to identify and determine the relevant thresholds, regimes and time scales, and to explore measures for coping with the transitions. Delft University of Technology is intensively collaborating with State Key Laboratory for Estuaries and Coasts (SKLEC) in Shanghai and Dutch partner Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ) in Yerseke.

This PhD project focuses on large-scale regime shifts in estuarine morphology. The focus will be on the Yangtze, Scheldt and Ems estuaries, which are all highly impacted by human interferences. The aim of this study is to identify and explain the complex relationship between human interventions and large-scale morphological changes. This will be done by applying and developing idealized models, applying detailed process-based numerical simulations and analysis of field data.


PhD: projects in general

As opposed to the situation in many other countries, Dutch universities do not have cursory PhD-programmes with a certain number of positions per year.

Our system is based upon proposals and grants, and it involves lengthy application procedures (duration at least one year, with a rather low score chance). In practice, this means that we apply for a position first, and start looking for a candidate once it has been granted.

All current positions and PhD opportunities are published on the Delft University of Technology website on the following webpages.