Dr. J.W.A. (Jan Willem) Foppen

Dr. J.W.A. (Jan Willem) Foppen

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Biography

Jan Willem Foppen (1965) received his M.Sc. degree in Hydrogeology from the VU University in Amsterdam in 1990. After his graduation, he started to work at Natuurmonumenten (nature conservation organization), and then as a consultant at the Institute of Applied Geosciences of TNO. In 1995-1996, he was stationed in Sana'a, Yemen, where he was part of a project team aimed to identify sources for the drinking water supply of Sana'a. 

Intrigued by poor groundwater health conditions in Sana'a, he focused on the transport of the fecal indicator organism Escherichia coli in saturated porous media, whereby the aim was to extend the colloid filtration theory. This work resulted in 10 publications in peer reviewed journals, and in June 2007, he obtained his PhD degree from the VU University, Amsterdam.

Besides the transport of bacteria in the subsurface, JWs research interests include: 

1) Water and sanitation in slums: T-GroUP websiteSCUSA website

2) DNA as a marker to study hydrologic processes. In search of new tracer substances to identify hydrologic processes, JW and his team used synthetic DNA in surface water injection experiments. Synthetic DNA is a small piece of 'organic matter', 100% natural, and completely harmless. Detection of these synthetic DNA molecules is carried out by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a method widely used in molecular microbiology, biomedical research, forensic diagnostics, etc.

Biography

Jan Willem Foppen (1965) received his M.Sc. degree in Hydrogeology from the VU University in Amsterdam in 1990. Intrigued by poor groundwater health conditions in developing countries, he focused on the transport of the fecal indicator organism Escherichia coli in saturated porous media, whereby the aim was to extend the colloid filtration theory. This work resulted in a PhD from IHE Delft and the VU University, Amsterdam.

Besides the transport of bacteria in the subsurface, JWs research interests include: 

1) Water and sanitation in slums: T-GroUP websiteSCUSA website

2) DNA as a marker to study hydrologic processes. In search of new tracer substances to identify hydrologic processes, JW and his team used synthetic DNA in surface water injection experiments. Synthetic DNA is a small piece of 'organic matter', 100% natural, and completely harmless. Detection of these synthetic DNA molecules is carried out by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a method widely used in molecular microbiology, biomedical research, forensic diagnostics, etc.

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Profile

Jan Willem Foppen (1965) received his M.Sc. degree in Hydrogeology from the VU University in Amsterdam in 1990. He worked for Natuurmonumenten, Dienst Grondwaterverkenning TNO, the Institute of Applied Geosciences of TNO, and since 1998 for IHE Delft. Since the beginning of 2021, Foppen is working 1 day per week at the TU Delft.

Intrigued by poor groundwater health conditions in various developing countries, Foppen focused on the transport of the fecal indicator organism Escherichia coli in saturated porous media, whereby the aim was to extend the colloid filtration theory. Over the years, his interest focused more on the transport of colloids in groundwater and surface waters.

Since 2016, he worked on silica DNA tracers. In search of new tracer substances to identify hydrologic processes, Foppen and his team used synthetic DNA in groundwater and surface water injection experiments. Synthetic DNA is a small piece of 'organic matter', 100% natural, and completely harmless. Detection of these synthetic DNA molecules is carried out by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a method widely used in molecular microbiology, biomedical research, forensic diagnostics, etc.

Besides the transport of bacteria and silica DNA tracers, his research interests include water and sanitation in slums in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Publications

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