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15 June 2018

Planting trees in the largest wave-testing site in the world

Can trees truly give us a break from floods? Bas Hofland (TU Delft) and two colleagues from Deltares and NIOZ are building the first forest ever in the largest wave-testing site in the world: the Delta Flume. They hope to make this experiment possible via crowdfunding.

12 June 2018

In-depth analysis of safety for swimmers around the Sand Engine

Pumping huge volumes of sand onto the coastline has effects on currents, waves and swim safety. Max Radermacher has compiled the first analysis of this problem to allow targeted measures (such as extra coastguards) to be taken where necessary. Radermacher will be awarded a PhD at TU Delft for his work on this subject on Friday 15 June.

07 June 2018

4TU Resilience Engineering Centre officially launched

Large power failures or heavy storms demonstrate how vulnerable our infrastructure is. The four technical universities in the Netherlands (Delft University of Technology, Eindhoven University of Technology, University of Twente, and Wageningen University and Research) are joining forces in the field of Resilience Engineering. On 7 June, the plans for the centre have been explained during an international launch event in Rotterdam.

04 June 2018

Vidi grant for Frans van der Meer

Frans van der Meer was awarded a VIDI grant worth EUR 800,000 for his proposal about composite laminate. VIDI grants are awarded by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) to enable laureates to set up their own research group to develop their own innovative line of research.

04 June 2018

CEG alumna Martha Deen wins Marina van Dammebeurs 2018

Can we combat climate change by drawing energy from the ocean? Martha Deen, alumna Applied Earth Sciences, has the ambition to map the potential of marine energy. She convinced a jury and won the Marina van Damme scholarship 2018 for female alumni of TU Delft.

31 May 2018

No increase in losses in Europe from floods in the past 150 years

Extreme hydrological events are generally predicted to become more frequent and damaging in Europe due to warming climate. Researchers from TU Delft and Rice University (Houston) have now shown that, correcting for economic and demographic changes, there has been no increase in financial losses and fatalities from floods in the last 150 years. They have reported on their findings in Nature Communications.

22 May 2018

Most wanted: wastewater

Technology such as MRI helps us to understand the processes that take place in biomass when we purify waste water with micro-organisms. We can use this knowledge to extract more energy and resources (and new pollution) from our own waste water. But we also need new knowledge to tackle problems in the rapidly expanding world cities, where waste water purification is often a relatively new concept. We can and must get much more out of our waste water. This is argued by Professor Merle de Kreuk, who will give her inaugural address at TU Delft on Wednesday, 23 May.