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04 October 2017

Updates from the SEAWAD research team

A month ago, a team of reseachers from different universities set out to investigate how the coast of the wadden sea will change and what can be done to protect it. In this article, the team describes their experiences and findings from the last month!

26 September 2017

Delft Harvey Texas Research Team organizes Harvey Hackathon

TU Delft has put together an interdisciplinary team to conduct research and respond to Hurricane Harvey funded by DIMI. The first phase consisted of fact finding through a Hackathon.

05 September 2017

Delft Harvey Texas Research Team

On August 25, 2017, Hurricane Harvey made landfall as a Category 4 hurricane near Rockport, Texas. Harvey’s high winds and storm surge caused devastation along the Texas coast. As Harvey moved slowly inland, meteorologists predicted that Harvey could drop over 35-40 inches of rain during the following week. As a result, unprecedented flooding has occurred over an area the size of the Netherlands. Houston, the 4th largest city in the U.S., is especially hard hit. Early estimates put the damages from Harvey in the top five historical events in the U.S.; over 20,000 people have sought emergency shelter as of August 30, 2017.

01 September 2017

The role of vegetated foreshores in coastal protection

Extreme weather is causing increasingly wide-spread flooding in coastal areas, as the events in the Southern United States have shown. In research project BE SAFE, the University of Twente, TU Delft and marine research institute NIOZ are working on combining more natural ways of coastal protection with conventional dikes.

05 August 2017

SEAWAD team researches Wadden Island development

04 August 2017

NL-UK-China collaboration on Sustainable Deltas

TU Delft, together with the University of London’s SOAS and the Shanghai Meteorological Service, have won a joint NSFC-EPSRC-NWO Cooperation China grant for a research project on Sustainable Deltas. Other project partners are the UK Met Office Hadley Centre, Shanghai Normal University, and East China Normal University.

09 June 2017

Two new stories of science

Two new stories of science have been posted on the Hydraulic engineering website. This time, Caroline Katsman talks about her research about the influence of ocean whirls on surface water sinking. Also Victor Chavarrias talks about his research about meandering and “humanised” rivers in the world.

09 June 2017

Timo Schweckendiek receives GEOSnet Young Researcher Award

On June 5, 2017 Dr. Timo Schweckendiek, research associate at the Department of Hydraulic Engineering of TU Delft, received the ‘GEOSnet Young Researcher Award’ at the Geo-Risk 2017 conference (Denver, USA).

26 May 2017

A Model Monument

Last Friday, a special hydraulic model was put in front of the office of Bas Jonkman. The model stands as a reminder of the early deceased Ir. Thijs van Zwieteren.

23 May 2017

Global mean sea level rise is accelerating faster than previously thought

Globally sea levels are on the rise. Now researchers from TU Delft and other European universities report a reconstruction of global mean sea level since 1902 that yields a slower average rise before 1990 than previously thought, but shows similar high rates as independent satellite observations from 1993-2012. This suggests that global mean sea level has been accelerating much faster than previously assumed in the past two decades. The results appear this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).