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15 April 2020

Scalable quantum bits operate under practical conditions

QuTech, a collaboration between TU Delft and TNO, has managed to control qubits in silicon at temperatures over 50 times higher than previously. The increase to practical temperatures represents a crucial leap towards a functional quantum computer. Qubits are the building blocks of a future quantum computer and operating at a higher temperature opens up the possibility of integrating both qubits and their controlling electronics onto one standard chip. The researchers published their findings in Nature today.

14 April 2020

Mechanical ventilator from the 1960s inspires Delft engineers

Today, a team of Delft researchers and students from the BioMechanical Engineering department is launching a new type of ventilator that is purely mechanical and which you could easily construct and repair yourself. The team borrowed a 1960s ventilator from Rijksmuseum Boerhaave and used it as inspiration. As it works mechanically, no electronics are required. This is particularly advantageous since its production is not dependent on the – now uncertain – supply of parts from China.

14 April 2020

Scientists design ventilator made of standard parts

Amir Zadpoor and a team of scientists from the BioMechanical Engineering department are testing the first prototypes of a ventilator that consists entirely of standard parts. These parts are available locally almost all over the world and can be produced by hundreds of manufacturers. This means that, in many cases, the ventilator can be assembled locally. It is hoped that the design will be able to respond to the demand for ventilators and offer a solution to the logistical problems resulting from a shortage of specific components.

09 April 2020

Reappointment of Tim van der Hagen as Rector Magnificus/President of the Executive Board

The Supervisory Board of TU Delft has reappointed Professor Tim van der Hagen as TU Delft Rector Magnificus/President of the Executive Board. The reappointment is for a period of four years and becomes effective on 1 May.

09 April 2020

The voice of Solotvyno

Former salt empire Solotvyno is located in western Ukraine. Today, the area suffers from the effects of salt extraction: an unstable subsurface resulting in massive sinkholes that threaten the life of the community. Two researchers from Delft University of Technology participated in a consortium to develop a disaster risk reduction plan together with the community. With the aim of giving the population a voice and building on a safer future. This short documentary provides insight into the process.

08 April 2020

A bit of math to constrain epidemics

06 April 2020

TU Delft joins International Universities Climate Alliance

An International Universities Climate Alliance (‘Climate Alliance’) has been established this week. Over 40 universities from around the world committed to collaborating for climate insight and action.

03 April 2020

OperationAIR student team creates working prototype for emergency ventilator

02 April 2020

FIOD and TU Delft join forces in investigating digital and financial crime

TU Delft researchers and students are helping the FIOD (Fiscal Information and Investigation Service) in its efforts to combat digital and financial crime. After a successful pilot, a longer-term research programme is now set to start.

02 April 2020

The strength of collagen

Collagen is the glue that holds our bodies together. It can be found in our skin, bones, muscles, cartilage, ligaments, hair, nails - in short, in almost every tissue in our body. In some places, for example in the skin, collagen proteins form networks that are very elastic. But why these networks are so elastic has so far been unclear. Researchers from Delft University of Technology, AMOLF and Wageningen University & Research have now discovered that the number of 'intersections' plays an important role. Between three and four connections per intersection is ideal. In fact, more connections makes the collagen networks less elastic. The new insights can be used, among other things, to repair damaged or aged tissue, such as cartilage or skin, and to grow new skin tissue for burn victims.