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25 April 2017

Be inspired at the TU Delft Research Exhibition

Be inspired at the TU Delft Research Exhibition

Staying up to date with the latest developments in science and technology is key in today’s business world. At the Delft University of Technology we have...

24 April 2017

Traditional Japanese uchimizu technique works to cool down hot cities

Traditional Japanese uchimizu technique works to cool down hot cities

The simple old Japanese tradition of water sprinkling - uchimizu - is an effective way of reducing extreme heat in cities. This will be TU Delft researcher Anna Solcerova's message at the EGU General Assembly (European Geosciences Union) in Vienna on Monday 24 April.

20 April 2017

‘Magic Table’ gets dementia patients moving

‘Magic Table’ gets dementia patients moving

The Tovertafel (Magic Table) is a light-hearted product that helps those suffering from dementia to exercise whilst bringing them pleasure.

19 April 2017

Coincidence and Twitter lead to discovery new crack in Greenland’s largest glacier

Coincidence and Twitter lead to discovery new crack in Greenland’s largest glacier

Something caught the eye of Stef Lhermitte last week, while he was looking through satellite images of the Greenland’s Petermann Glacier. Almost by coincidence he saw a new thin line, as he was going through ESA Sentinel-1 images for research on melt. He checked other satellite images, and saw the line, apparently unnoticed until then, first appear on July 2016. In a series of five tweets, Lhermitte shared his discovery, hoping someone might be able to shed some light.

18 April 2017

Technical Medicine Master’s programme to start in September 2017

Technical Medicine Master’s programme to start in September 2017

It is impossible to imagine the healthcare sector without medical technology. Innovative diagnosis and treatment methods call for a new type of medical professional; someone with both medical and technical knowledge, who can form a link between patients and technology.

13 April 2017

Technical Medicine Master’s programme to start in September 2017

Technical Medicine Master’s programme to start in September 2017

It is impossible to imagine the healthcare sector without medical technology. Innovative diagnosis and treatment methods call for a new type of...

12 April 2017

ERC Advanced Grant to develop virtual seismology

ERC Advanced Grant to develop virtual seismology

Prof. Kees Wapenaar from TU Delft received an ERC Advanced Grant worth €2.5 million for his VirtualSeis programme.

12 April 2017

Robot ‘Skin’ can help more efficient human-robot collaboration

Partners from the Factory-in-a-Day project have developed a robot prototype that consist of a robotic arm completely covered with sensors.

07 April 2017

Researchers print promising two-dimensional transistors

Researchers print promising two-dimensional transistors

Researchers from AMBER and Trinity College in Dublin, in collaboration with TU Delft, have fabricated printed transistors consisting entirely...

06 April 2017

TU Delft article on the eternal battle between bacteria and viruses featured in Science Magazine

TU Delft article on the eternal battle between bacteria and viruses featured in Science Magazine

Science Magazine, published on Friday 7 April, features an article by TU Delft researchers and others on the CRISPR systems in bacteria and how they offer resistance to viruses.

06 April 2017

Working on the next generation of batteries in the new battery lab

Working on the next generation of batteries in the new battery lab

On 6 April, a new laboratory was opened at the Reactor Institute Delft (RID): the Battery Lab of Radiation, Science & Technology.

06 April 2017

Hans Wamelink appointed as new Dean of TPM

The TU Delft Executive Board has appointed Professor Hans Wamelink as Dean of the Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management (TPM) with effect from 1 May 2017. Wamelink is currently Professor of Design and Construction Management at the Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment (Arch) and Chair of the Management in the Built Environment (MBE) Department.

04 April 2017

Possibility of ‘hydraulic’ offshore wind farm

Possibility of ‘hydraulic’ offshore wind farm

For his doctorate awarded on Tuesday, 4 April, TU Delft researcher Antonio Jarquin Laguna investigated the possibility of a ‘hydraulic’ offshore wind farm. It involves the direct drive mechanism of the wind turbine being replaced by a positive displacement pump, which is used to bring pressurised seawater into a hydraulic network.

30 March 2017

Jeroen van den Hoven appointed member European Expert Group on Ethics in Science

The European Commission has appointed Jeroen van den Hoven to the European Group on Ethics in Science and New Technologies (EGE). He will be one of the 15 high-calibre members who will advise the Commission on all areas of policy where ethical, societal and fundamental rights issues intersect with the development of science and new technologies.

30 March 2017

TU Delft partner in National Blockchain Coalition

On 30 March, Henk Kamp, Dutch Minister of Economic Affairs, took receipt of the action agenda of the National Blockchain Coalition. The agenda is a joint initiative by more than twenty organisations – including the TU Delft Blockchain Lab – from the logistics, energy and financial sectors, as well as knowledge institutions and government bodies. The Netherlands aims to use the agenda to be an international pioneer in the application of blockchain technology.

29 March 2017

Henri Werij appointed dean of the Faculty of Aerospace Engineering (AE)

The Executive Board has appointed Dr Henri Werij as dean of the Faculty of Aerospace Engineering (AE), starting from 1 June 2017. Dr Werij is currently Director of Space and Scientific Instrumentation at TNO. Werij studied experimental physics at Leiden University, where he obtained his doctorate with honours in 1988. He then worked as a researcher at the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics (JILA) in Boulder, Colorado (US) and at the University of Amsterdam. He has been connected to TNO since 1993, first as a scientist and subsequently in a variety of (management) roles.

27 March 2017

Richard Goossens new chair of TU Delft Health Initiative

Richard Goossens new chair of TU Delft Health Initiative

As of 1 April, Professor Richard Goossens has been appointed chair of the TU Delft Health Initiative. Richard Goossens succeeds Professor Lucas van Vliet, who has held the role since the TU Delft Health Initiative was launched in 2009 and has been dean of the Faculty of Applied Sciences since 2016.

27 March 2017

Dutch ‘cameras’ on NASA Science Mission

‘First complete study of all phases of the stellar life cycle’

21 March 2017

KNAW appoints Marileen Dogterom to its board

On the 1st of June, Marileen Dogterom, professor of bionanoscience at TU Delft and professor of atomic and molecular physics at Leiden University, will join the board of The Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) for one day a week. The appointment term is four years. Dogterom will succeed Ben Feringa, who has completed his term.

20 March 2017

European grant brings smart industrial robots within reach of Dutch companies

European grant brings smart industrial robots within reach of Dutch companies

TU Delft researchers are set to receive an EU grant of €7.6 million to develop open-source robotics software. The move will bring smart industrial robots within the reach of Dutch companies, since half of the budget will be available for partners in industry willing to work on the development of applications.

17 March 2017

Delft University of Technology organises first anti-drone race

Delft University of Technology organises first anti-drone race

To incorporate drones in our lives in a good and safe way, we need anti-drone instruments. On 13 February 2018 the TU Delft Micro Air Vehicle Lab (MAVLab) will therefore host the first ever anti-drone competition DroneClash. During this competition participants use their own drone(s) to take down as many other drones as possible. They also need to avoid a whole series of anti-drone interventions. Teams who wish to take part in the competition can register from this week.

16 March 2017

Leap frogging with sustainable innovations in Myanmar

Leap frogging with sustainable innovations in Myanmar

The Myanmar Ministries of Agriculture, Environment and Transport have expressed the need for more smart data measurements and analyses.

15 March 2017

KLM and TU Delft test and optimise new products and processes in live situation

KLM and TU Delft test and optimise new products and processes in live situation

KLM and Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) today signed a cooperation agreement entitled Design Doing at Royal Dutch Airlines. The aim of the partnership is to develop new products and optimise existing KLM processes in a real-life operational KLM environment, in other words with real passengers at a real airport and with real aircraft. By doing so, KLM is heavily investing in the application of what is known as Design Thinking.

14 March 2017

Lotte Leufkens is Dutch student entrepreneur of the year 2017

Lotte Leufkens is Dutch student entrepreneur of the year 2017

On Friday March 10th Lotte Leufkens TU student and founder of CloudCuddle, was named entrepreneur of the year 2017 in the Dutch finals of the Global Student Entrepreneur Award. Along with eight other Dutch student entrepreneurs they pitched to a jury of student entrepreneurs, experienced entrepreneurs and scale-up entrepreneurs. In May, Lotte will represent the Netherlands in the worldwide finals in Frankfurt.

10 March 2017

Improved monitoring and prevention of aging of Picasso and Mondrian paintings

Improved monitoring and prevention of aging of Picasso and Mondrian paintings

A consortium of researchers from the worlds of museum, science and industry have developed a method to establish the extent to which titanium white – an important white pigment – is causing modern paintings to age. The method can detect aging early in the process, meaning that timely action can be taken to protect major paintings. The results of the research have been accepted by the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

08 March 2017

Eight subjects in Top 50 of QS World University Rankings by Subject

In the World University Rankings by Subjects published today, TU Delft has two subjects in the top ten: ‘Architecture / Built Environment’ and ‘Engineering – Civil & Structural’. Eight subjects at TU Delft are in the world top 50.

07 March 2017

‘Access to information after a disaster should be a human right’

When we hear ‘emergency aid’, most of us initially think of medical assistance, food and shelter. However, the large amount of information that is available nowadays is having an increasingly greater impact on the effectiveness of relief efforts. You could indeed go as far as to say that the provision of information should be a human right, as Bartel Van de Walle will argue in his inaugural address at TU Delft on Friday, 10 March 2017.

06 March 2017

Infrasonic sounds in the earth

The rumbling of Mount Etna on Sicily can be measured as far afield as De Bilt. Infrasound from the volcano is very low frequency sound travelling through the atmosphere. It is inaudible to the human ear yet still measurable. So says seismologist Läslo Evers of the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), who is researching infrasound and conducts measurements using special equipment. On Wednesday 8 March, he will deliver his inaugural lecture as part-time Professor of Seismo-Acoustics at TU Delft.

06 March 2017

Online programming course provides new insights into learning behaviour of children

Online programming course provides new insights into learning behaviour of children

It is better if parents do not get too involved when their children are learning to programme. This is one of the results of the research into the TU Delft online course (MOOC) which teaches programming to children. The research on the MOOC will be presented at the prestigious ICSE Conference in Buenos Aires at the end of May.

03 March 2017

Researchers demonstrate new type of laser

Lasers are everywhere nowadays: doctors use them to correct eyesight, cashiers to scan your groceries, and quantum scientist to control qubits in the future quantum computer. For most applications, the current bulky, energy inefficient lasers are fine, but quantum scientist work at extremely low temperatures and on very small scales. For over 40 years, they have been searching for efficient and precise microwave lasers that will not disturb the very cold environment in which quantum technology works. A team of researchers led by Leo Kouwenhoven at TU Delft has demonstrated an on-chip microwave laser based on a fundamental property of superconductivity, the ac Josephson effect. They embedded a small section of an interrupted superconductor, a Josephson junction, in a carefully engineered on-chip cavity. Such a device opens the door to many applications in which microwave radiation with minimal dissipation is key, for example in controlling qubits in a scalable quantum computer. The scientists have published their work in Science on the 3rd of March.

28 February 2017

TU Delft launches MicroMasters program Solar Energy Engineering on edX

TU Delft launches MicroMasters program Solar Energy Engineering on edX

Delft University of Technology (the Netherlands) launches a MicroMasters program Solar Energy Engineering via online platform edX on April 25. The program is developed to give (future) professionals an edge in the rapidly growing Solar Energy industry. By providing in-depth knowledge and engineering skills the program supports them to become an expert in photovoltaics, advance their career and contribute to the energy transition to renewable energy sources. The MicroMasters program offers four graduate-level online courses treating photovoltaic energy conversion, technologies, systems and the integration of photovoltaic systems in microgrids and a capstone project.

27 February 2017

The Informed Researcher

The Informed Researcher

In January 2016, the Library has introduced the course “The Informed Researcher”, which deals with the development of skills such as the ability to search for, organize, and disseminate information and data as listed in the Vitae Researcher Development Framework(1). It further links these steps to the Open Science principles. This course is a new and improved version of “How to Manage your Research Information”, based on comments and feedback of participants.

24 February 2017

Major gains still to be made in quality of arm prostheses

Major gains still to be made in quality of arm prostheses

Mona Hichert argues that existing arm prostheses can be improved, and indeed need to be improved. Hichert obtains her doctorate from TU Delft on Friday, 24 February 2017.

21 February 2017

Kavli Institute of Nanoscience Delft Receives Major New Funding

Kavli Institute of Nanoscience Delft Receives Major New Funding

The Kavli Institute of Nanoscience Delft will receive additional major funding to further advance its successful program in biological and quantum nanoscience. Provided by The Kavli Foundation, the Kavli Institute will receive $200,000 annually over ten years – funds that will be matched equally by TU Delft. These funds will supplement annual revenue already provided by the Institute’s endowment, which was first established in 2004 and increased in 2008.

20 February 2017

Conference about Universities and Entrepreneurship

Conference about Universities and Entrepreneurship

On Thursday November 10th, Ellen van Andel (TU Delft Valorisation Centre) participated in the 2 days’ conference on ‘Universities, Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Development in Africa’ which took place in Bonn, Germany. Read the blog Ellen van Andel wrote about this event.

20 February 2017

Story of Science on autonomous transport for wheelchair-bound children

The faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences published a new "Story of Science". This edition is about a feasibility study on wheelchair-bound transport for children, performed by Niels van Oort.

16 February 2017

Cells divide by ‘bricklaying on moving scaffolding’

It is the most crucial mechanism in life - the division of cells. For 25 years, it has been known that bacteria split into two by forming a Z ring at their centre. They use this to cut themselves into two daughter cells. Using advanced microscopes, researchers from the universities of Harvard, Indiana, Newcastle, and Delft have succeeded in finding out how bacteria do this. The bacteria appear to build a new cell wall working from the outside in, with the help of multiple molecular ‘bricklayers’, in about a quarter of an hour. What was completely unexpected was that the ‘bricklayers’ move along the inside of the wall under construction by ‘treadmilling’; the building of the cell wall is performed from scaffolding that is continuously being moved at the front, while at the rear it is continuously being dismantled. The scientists will be publishing an article on the topic in Science on 17 February.

16 February 2017

EPA students and alumni successful at Hackaton for Humanitarian Aid

EPA students and alumni successful at Hackaton for Humanitarian Aid

On February 11th and 12th, 2017 the “Hackaton for Humanitarian Aid” was organised by PwC, UNHCR and UNOCH in Amsterdam. EPA student and alumni teams participated in the two-day contest. EPA alumni Tariq Abdul Muhaimin and Naveen Srivatsav were members of the overall winning team and will be presenting their invention at UNHCR Headquarters in Geneva.

15 February 2017

Kijk magazine awarded ‘spina bifida closer’ as best tech-idea 2016

The idea of researchers from TU Delft, Erasmus MC and LUMC of using 3D printing techniques to close spina bifida of unborn children, is according to the magazine Kijk the best Dutch tech-idea of the year. The scientists from Delft, Rotterdam and Leiden are collaborating on a long needle, equipped with a 3D head, that provides the spina bifida of a protective cap in the womb.

15 February 2017

TU Delft start-up ShoreMonitoring helps free houseboats in Gennep

Damage to the barrage in the River Meuse near Grave has led to a drop in the water level at the Port of Heijen/Gennep. As a result, some houseboats are tilted, some are taking on water, while the strain on the hulls of others is becoming critical. The longer the water level remains low, the more damage will be done. The TU Delft start-up ShoreMonitoring used a jetski to chart the shallow areas around the houseboats, the mouth of the port and the lake. With this information, the Directorate-General for Public Works and Water Management (Rijkswaterstaat) aided by another start-up, Mobiele Dijken, constructed a temporary dike to keep more water in the port.

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