Curriculum

You will be present at the faculty every day from 8.45-17.30 in the first year. In the second and third years, the number of contact hours will decrease and you will increasingly study independently. On average, you will spend two half-day sessions a week on lab experiments. In the third year, you will take a minor, studying 'something different' (and often somewhere else) for six months and you will be independently conducting full-time graduation research for 10 weeks.

Study plan

You will take many theoretical and applied physics courses in the Bachelor's degree programme. This makes sense, as you need to be sufficiently familiar with all sub-areas as a future physical engineer. Since mathematics is the 'language' of physics, you will also take a substantial dose of mathematics.

Check the detailed study plan for the Bachelor Applied Sciences here (in Dutch).

Year 1

You have 40 scheduled contact hours per week in the first year. The year is divided into eight education periods (octals) of five weeks: four weeks of teaching and one week of examinations. In general, you take one physics course, one mathematics course and one laboratory course or project per octal.

During the first six months (semester), you will take a number of basic courses in physics, such as Mechanics, Waves and Optics, Electricity and Magnetism, and Modern Physics, and the foundation of the required mathematical knowledge will be laid in the Analysis course. In addition to these theoretical courses, you will take the Physics laboratory course, in which you learn how to set up experiments and report on them on an individual basis as a physicist.

In the second semester, the physics courses Electromagnetism and Mechanics & Relativity Theory, and the mathematical courses Linear Algebra and Advanced Analysis, require more abstract thinking from you. You will also take the applied physics course Thermodynamics and the socially oriented Technology Management. You will also follow the design subject Design Engineering for Physicists in which you will learn to use physics in designing and making devices.

Year 2

You have around 28 scheduled contact hours per week in the second year. In addition, you will spend around twelve hours per week on self-study. The year once again consists of eight octals of five weeks, with two theoretical courses, and one laboratory course or project per octal. Each octal is concluded with an examination week.

The theoretical courses are more in-depth than in the first year and are taught in lectures, followed by tutorials. The theory is explained in the lectures, while you independently study the theory and learn to apply it in groups in the tutorials. This concerns basic physics courses such as Quantum Mechanics, Waves and Statistical Physics, as well as typical TU Delft technology courses such as Systems and Signals, and Multi-scale Physics. The amount of mathematics is less than in the first year.

You will also conduct independent research. In four Research laboratory courses, you will work in a real research group.

Year 3

In the first half of the third year, you will take a so-called minor – you will choose a subject that is very different from physics. For example: mathematics, mechanical engineering, medical technology, computer science, law and economy, finance, entrepreneurship or Japanese studies. Some minors are very theoretical, while others are very practical. You can take the minor in Delft, but you can also take it at another university. Even abroad. 
You can also further deepen your knowledge of physics during the minor. A special in-depth minor was introduced for this purpose at Leiden University for TU Delft students of Applied Physics who want to build on the physics knowledge that they learned in the first two years.

In the second half of the third year, you will take several advanced physics courses such as Optics, Solid Particle Physics and Quantum Mechanics, and a philosophical course in Science and Argumentation Theory. You will complete the Bachelor's programme with an independent research project. You conduct (partial) research full-time on an individual basis in one of the research groups for ten weeks. You will be researching something completely new, which nobody has researched before. You will report on this research orally and in writing.

In general, you will be expected to be fairly resourceful yourself in the third year. You will then be a mature, independent scientist who can plan his/her own study activities and who sets out to acquire interesting knowledge.

Minor

In semester 1 of year 3 of the Bachelor’s degree programme, you will have the opportunity to spend six months broadening your horizons and exploring a subject that interests you, in the way that suits you best. You can also further deepen your knowledge of physics during the minor. A special in-depth minor was introduced for this purpose at Leiden University for TU Delft students of Applied Physics who want to build on the physics knowledge that they learned in the first two years. Alternatively, you can broaden your horizon by opting for a cohesive combination of courses, an internship or a course abroad. A well-chosen minor can help you to find the career direction that suits you, or decide which Master's programme you want to take after your Bachelor's degree programme.

More information about Minors


Read more about admission requirements 



Binding recommendation

TU Delft employs the BSA system: the binding recommendation on the continuation of studies. This means that you must obtain at least 75 per cent of your credits (i.e. 45 of the 60 ECTS) in your first year in order to continue your programme. If you receive a negative binding recommendation on the continuation of studies, you will not be permitted to enroll in this programme again in the next 4 years.


Questions?

Contact our academic counsellors

GertJan Broekman

Alyssa van ’t Hout