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From cleanroom to boardroom

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The power of small numbers

Smart sensors with impact

The DESHIMA guide to the galaxy

Astronomers looking to find out more about the early beginnings of our universe need to measure infrared light which has taken between 2 and 10 billion years to reach earth. Sensitive instruments are required for this. A team from our faculty is working on superconductive and extremely sensitive measurement equipment that can speed up the current measurement process 100-fold. This autumn, they will be travelling to Chile to install and test the equipment. Once it all works, we will be able to create 3D maps of star systems, allowing us to look back in time and space.

Why we should all change our online selves into 'John Doe'

We as users are turning into data providers rather than consumers. All the data that we share via social media or give to online services such as purchasing, is stored somewhere … And sadly, some of that data is literally out in the open. Zeki Erkin explains why we should all care about protecting our privacy and why cryptography is the way forward.

"Why we should all change our online selves into 'John Doe'"

We as users are turning into data providers rather than consumers. All the data that we share via social media or give to online services such as purchasing, is stored somewhere … And sadly, some of that data is literally out in the open. Zeki Erkin explains why we should all care about protecting our privacy and why cryptography is the way forward.

Bringing the medical world into science non-fiction

Zaid Al-Ars, Associate Professor in the Computer Engineering Lab at TU Delft, is a computer engineer who possesses a pretty decent internal hard drive himself. He studied electrical engineering and obtained a doctorate in computer technology before joining first-year students again to study medicine. He is one of the first engineers who are sincerely fascinated by human beings. And he has the drive to introduce ‘Star Trek’ technology into a very conservative world.

Will the Terminator come to life?

Will humans become cyborgs by 2050? If they do, is that such a bad thing? Wouter Serdijn, Professor in Bio-Electronics at TU Delft, is thinking out loud.

The Earth's youngest animal species

Anyone walking through associate professor Chris Verhoeven's lab at TU Delft will see a miniature animal kingdom. Some of the animals are a metre in length and others just the size of a matchbox. Some can fly, others walk or swim, and all of them have different characteristics. But there is not a biologist to be seen anywhere in the vicinity. Verhoeven is developing the ‘animals’ of the future: robots in all shapes and sizes. The most successful species from the lab have six legs that enable them to negotiate obstacles with ease. They were what gave the Zebro project its name (ZEsBenige Robot is the Dutch term for six-legged robot).

Next generation: solar cells as construction materials

There are increasing numbers of solar panels on roofs, converting sunlight into low-cost electricity for households or businesses. In the future, you will very probably also be wearing solar cells. They will be integrated into the fabric of your rucksack, for instance, charging your laptop as you walk. Or your jacket will consist partly of solar cells, ensuring that your phone battery lasts for much longer.

Computational Science

Electric transport

The number of hybrid and electric cars in the Netherlands will increase exponentially over the next few years. Currently, there are 120,000 cars with a charging cable; in 2025, their number is expected to have passed the one million mark. Good news for the climate, but what does this trend mean for our electricity grid, for the price of power, and for our cities?

Forecasting gigantic ash clouds

Seven years ago, Europe was under the spell of an enormous ash cloud, following the eruption of a volcano on the Eyjafjalla Glacier in Iceland. The cloud brought air traffic to a complete standstill in a large part of Europe, caused a great deal of disruption and entailed significant costs. Two PhD candidates from the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science (Mathematical Physics), Guangliang Fu and Sha Lu, looked at the behaviour of such a cloud and how its course might be predicted.

Healthy mathematics

Mathematics playing a role in the medical world is a relatively new development. Since the advent of medical imaging, several decades ago, applications have been introduced in the form of models. ‘You truly need mathematics to interpret data.’

Digital remote passenger scanning

Nuria Llombart is working on innovative airport security techniques. In the future, you will be remotely scanned for concealed objects before you even reach the traditional scanner.

Start spreading the news

A social data science expert explains how to tackle the grizzly problem of fake news.

Robots are a new species

‘Robots should be part of society.’ Associate professor Chris Verhoeven is a man with a vision: Delft, the first city where robots live in the wild. And a campus where drones are free to fly.

Trailblazers of the wireless revolution

A vision of the future: a completely wireless world, in the fields of both communications and energy. It may not look too exciting on paper, but the consequences are almost too far-reaching to grasp – certainly if future devices will (theoretically) last forever and will all be able to communicate with each other.

From gamification to blended learning

We’re used to the idea of lecturers and students meeting up online for a lecture (or a variation on the theme of a lecture). But what’s the next step? Here are five examples of educational innovations from EEMCS.

Extreme weather

Geurt Jongbloed is Professor of Statistics and chairman of the Department of Applied Mathematics (DIAM). Together with Juan-Juan Cai and Jasper Velthoen from his group, he is researching how the quality of short-term forecasts of extreme weather can be improved.

Self-driving cars: the next major technological revolution

Grandpa, did you have to drive a car yourself?! There is absolutely no doubt in the mind of TU Delft researchers working on self-driving cars: this is going to be the major technological revolution of the decades ahead.

The 7 challenges facing Koen Hindriks

Bursting filter bubbles

“A familiar example: you are comparing hotel prices for a business trip, and your screen is subsequently overrun with advertisements for hotel providers”, begins Cynthia Liem. This might not be earth-shattering, but the same phenomenon applies to the news items displayed to you online.

‘We could discover something that could change our whole view of the universe’

Astronomer Dr Akira Endo is working on a brand-new measuring instrument that should lead to great improvements in how astronomers study the most active galaxies.