News

26 April 2022

ERC Advanced Grant for chemical dream reactions with enzymes

ERC Advanced Grant for chemical dream reactions with enzymes

One of the big societal challenges today, is that the chemical industry still consumes a considerable amount of energy and resources. “This is a global issue for most, if not all, chemicals that factories produce nowadays”, says researcher Frank Hollmann. He has received a 2.5 M€ ERC Advanced Grant from the European Union to help tackle this problem over the next five years, by engineering enzymes as a catalyst for chemical reactions.

15 April 2022

National Growth Fund finances Cellular Agriculture

National Growth Fund finances Cellular Agriculture

The National Growth Fund of the Dutch government grants conditional funding of 60 million euros to the Cellular Agriculture consortium, whose goal is to produce and promote protein-rich food from cultivated cells. The TU Delft is one of the founders of the consortium, with Marcel Ottens as initiator of the line of research. The TU Delft, together with the companies PlanetBio, DSM, Meatable, CE Delft and others, forms a hub in Delft for this new field of work.

24 February 2022

Mark van Loosdrecht wins Novozymes Prize for 25 years of revolutionary wastewater treatment

Mark van Loosdrecht wins Novozymes Prize for 25 years of revolutionary wastewater treatment

The development of new technologies for biological wastewater treatment is turning our view of sludge upside down. Microbiologist Mark van Loosdrecht receives the 2022 Novozymes Prize for his pioneering work in copying and reusing nature’s mechanisms in wastewater treatment and resource recovery. Van Loosdrecht: “Treating wastewater will become good business in the future.”

23 December 2021

Super-fast technique measures heme enzyme reaction as it happens

Super-fast technique measures heme enzyme reaction as it happens

Researchers from TU Delft found an unexpected new enzyme intermediate at work in enzymes that contain heme, a cofactor that’s vital for many processes in our body such as the breaking down of toxins in the liver. The researchers used new, rapid techniques, which are less invasive than existing methods. The results, published in ACS Catalysis, increase our understanding of heme proteins and enzymes and how they can be engineered.

25 November 2021

BEI Best MSc Graduate 2021: Alicia Rodríguez Molina!

27 October 2021

Making artificial leather while processing wastewater

Making artificial leather while processing wastewater

Leather is a strong product but has been getting bad press lately due to the fact that it is made of animal skins and the production process is a burden on the environment. The TU Delft student team WaterSkins has come up with a very sustainable alternative: artificial leather made during the treatment of wastewater.

06 August 2021

New yeast species could make biotechnology more sustainable

New yeast species could make biotechnology more sustainable

Yeasts usually need oxygen to reproduce. However, researchers at TU Delft have now come across a highly unusual species of yeast that is capable of rapid growth even without oxygen. How does it do that? By replacing an essential component of the normal yeast cell with a surrogate molecule. In theory, this discovery could make the industrial production of beer and biofuels using yeasts more sustainable and efficient. The results of this study have been published in the scientific journal PNAS.

29 April 2021

Researchers create living material based on algae

Researchers create living material based on algae

Researchers led by Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) used 3D printing to create a novel, environmentally-friendly and living material made of algae that has many potential applications.

07 April 2021

Using molecular sieves to adjust the taste of non-alcoholic beer

Using molecular sieves to adjust the taste of non-alcoholic beer

Researcher Deborah Gernat has created a new method to further develop the taste of non-alcoholic beer, in collaboration with Heineken. The technique, which is based on molecular sieves, gives brewers a new tool to bring the taste of non-alcoholic beer closer to that of regular beer. The first tests showed that the sweet 'wort taste' that often characterizes alcohol-free beer can be reduced using this method. On April 9th, Deborah Gernat will receive her doctorate on this subject at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft).

11 January 2021

Delft researchers build artificial chromosome

Delft researchers build artificial chromosome

Biotechnologists at Delft University of Technology have built an artificial chromosome in yeast. The chromosome can exist alongside the natural yeast chromosomes, and serves as a platform to safely and easily add new functions to the micro-organism. Researchers can use the artificial chromosome to convert yeast cells into living factories capable of producing useful chemicals and even medicines.

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