Biotechnology

Innovation is crucial to fulfil the potential of industrial biotechnology for sustainable production of fuels, chemicals, materials, food and feed. Similarly, scientific and technological advances in environmental biotechnology are needed to enable novel approaches to water purification, and ‘waste-to-product’ processes thus contributing to a circular economy. Increased fundamental knowledge encompassing enzymes, microorganisms and processes are essential for progress in this field. The Department of Biotechnology covers this research area and, based on new insights, selects, designs and tests new biobased catalysts, micro-organisms, and processes.

The department encompasses five research sections:

News

28 May 2020

Awards for three researchers of AS

It's raining awards at the Faculty of Applied Sciences. No less than three researchers have been rewarded with various prizes over the past period. They are Ad van Well, Arthur Gorter de Vries and Jasmijn Hassing. Together with colleagues from 3mE, Ad van Well (Radiation Science & Technology) received the Vanadium Award for the best scientific article of 2019 in the fiel of vanadium research . The award is presented by the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IOM3) in Great Britain. The article stems from the HTM/NWO Nano-steel project, in which Ad van Well and his colleagues, especially PhD candidate Chrysoula Ioannidou, are researching a new type of steel that is both strong and malleable: pure ferrite reinforced with nanoparticles of vanadium carbide. Ex-researcher A rthur Gorter de Vries (Biotechnology) received the Westerdijk Award for the best dissertation of the year in the category Environmental & Applied Microbiology . This award is presented by the Royal Dutch Society for Microbiology (KNVM) and the Dutch Society for Medical Microbiology (NVMM). Gorter de Vries was frequently in the news before his promotion, among other things because he witnessed the emergence of a new gene in the lab and because of his discovery that all pilsner yeasts, the famous microorganisms that brewers produce hundreds of billions of litres of lager and other lager beers with every year, were created some 500 years ago in a one-off encounter between two types of yeast . Jasmijn Hassing, like Gorter de Vries from the group of Jean-Marc Daran (Biotechnology), received the Kiem Award. This prize is also awarded by the KNVM/NVMM, and is intended for excellent papers in which starting young microbiologists are the first authors. In order to qualify, the article must have been published in an internationally renowned journal in the past year. Hassing was awarded the prize for a paper on the production of 2-phenylethanol using yeast. 2-phenylethanol is an organic, aromatic compound that smells like roses and is widely used in the food and cosmetics industries.

News

15 January 2016

Algae prove promising candidates for biodiesel production via 'survival of the fattest'

Smart methods for cultivating algae bring the efficient production of biodiesel using algae in sight. On Tuesday 19 January, Peter Mooij will obtain his doctorate at TU Delft for his work on this subject. CO 2 neutral There is huge scientific interest in the use of microalgae to produce carbohydrates and in particular lipids (fats), as lipids from microalgae can be converted into biodiesel. The amount of CO 2 released by the combustion of this biodiesel is equal to the amount of CO 2 that was previously extracted from the atmosphere by the microalgae. Thus the use of biodiesel does not lead to an increase in CO 2 in the atmosphere. 'Microalgae offer two huge advantages over other biological oil production platforms', says doctoral candidate Peter Mooij from TU Delft. 'Firstly, after cultivation, microalgae can be made up relatively largely of lipids. And secondly, relatively little fresh water and agricultural land is required to cultivate microalgae.' Survival of the fattest Mooij uses a smart method to cultivate suitable algae that is economically viable for large-scale algae production: survival of the fattest. The fattest algae survive. 'In the reactor we give a competitive advantage to the algae with the required characteristics, in this case the production of carbohydrates and fats. We start with a collection of 'ordinary' algae. During the day we provide them with light and CO 2 . This is enough for them to produce oil, however they are unable to divide. They need nutrients for cell division and they are only given these in the dark. To absorb these nutrients, the algae need energy and carbon. This means that only the fattest algae can divide, as they have stored these during the day. By removing some of the algae every day, the culture will eventually exist of only the fattest algae.' Starch 'All of our experiments led to systems in which carbohydrates (starch) formed the primary energy storage compounds', continues Mooij. 'So we have found a suitable environment in which carbohydrate production by algae is rewarded.' Unfortunately this environment is not yet selective for the storage of fats. The culture environment needs to be made even more specific to achieve this. 'But a greater understanding of the ecological role of lipids and carbohydrates in microalgae clears the way for the creation of lipid-specific selective environments. Rewarding a microalga for showing the desired behaviour by using a selective environment, one of the central concepts in my research, will be shown to be a valuable approach once there is a better understanding of the ecological role of lipids.' More information For further information please contact Peter Mooij tel. +31 6 - 483 826 35 or p.r.mooij@tudelft.nl or Wendy Batist, press officer TU Delft via tel. +31 - 15 - 27 884 99 or g.m.batist@tudelft.nl . Please read Peter Mooij's blogs on Faces of Science (only in Dutch).
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