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02 June 2021

Shining light on two-dimensional magnets

Shining light on two-dimensional magnets

Atomically thin van der Waals magnets are widely seen as the ultimately compact media for future magnetic data storage and fast data processing. Controlling the magnetic state of these materials in real-time, however, has proven difficult. But now, an international team of researchers led by Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) has managed to use light in order to change the anisotropy of a van der Waals antiferromagnet on demand, paving the way to new, extremely efficient means of data storage.

27 May 2021

Researchers make 3D image with light microscope

Researchers make 3D image with light microscope

For the first time, Delft researchers have succeeded in making a three-dimensional image of a cellular component using light. The component in question is the nuclear pore complex: tunnels that facilitate traffic to and from the cell nucleus. Studying cell components in 3D can help to determine the cause of various diseases, among other things. The researchers have published their findings in Nature Communications.

27 May 2021

A new tool to understand the brain

A new tool to understand the brain

How does our brain work? An international team of researchers, including lead author Daan Brinks of TU Delft, has taken another step towards answering that question. They have created a new tool that allows them to image electrical signals in brains with an unprecedented combination of precision, resolution, sensitivity, and depth.

21 May 2021

Scientists overhear two atoms chatting

Scientists overhear two atoms chatting

How materials behave depends on the interactions between countless atoms. You could see this as a giant group chat in which atoms are continuously exchanging quantum information. Researchers from Delft University of Technology in collaboration with RWTH Aachen University and the Research Center Jülich have now been able to intercept a chat between two atoms. They present their findings in Science on 28 May.

17 May 2021

New research shows: Antoni van Leeuwenhoek led rivals astray

New research shows: Antoni van Leeuwenhoek led rivals astray

A microscope used by Antoni van Leeuwenhoek to conduct pioneering research contains a surprisingly ordinary lens, as new research by Rijksmuseum Boerhaave Leiden and TU Delft shows. It is a remarkable finding, because Van Leeuwenhoek (1632-1723) led other scientists to believe that his instruments were exceptional. Consequently, there has been speculation about his method for making lenses for more than three centuries. The results of this study were published in Science Advances on May 14.

10 May 2021

Physicast with Roel Smit

Physicast with Roel Smit

The first episode of the Physicast is online: the podcast for and by all those who have something to do with the world of Applied Physics. Listen to it during your relaxing walk or on the couch! In this episode, Annelot has a conversation with Roel Smit

06 May 2021

Researchers discover how a cell’s armour can be both flexible and strong

Researchers discover how a cell’s armour can be both flexible and strong

Medieval knights either had thick, cumbersome armour, or they could wear less protective armour and be flexible in combat – they couldn’t have both. Cells, on the other hand, do have it all. Researchers from Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Leeds University, Institut Fresnel in Marseille, and Institut Curie in Paris discovered that proteins called ‘septins’ reinforce the fragile membrane of a cell, while still being flexible enough to allow the cell to change shape.

29 April 2021

Researchers create living material based on algae

Researchers create living material based on algae

Researchers led by Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) used 3D printing to create a novel, environmentally-friendly and living material made of algae that has many potential applications.

28 April 2021

NWO awards 10 million euros for solving cyber security issues

NWO awards 10 million euros for solving cyber security issues

26 April 2021

Royal Honors for three TU Delft professors

Royal Honors for three TU Delft professors

De Delftse hoogleraren Pieternel Levelt, Jack Pronk en Kees Vuik hebben dit jaar een Koninklijke Onderscheiding ontvangen.

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