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01 October 2021

Safety and modernisation go hand in hand at Reactor Institute Delft (RID)

Safety and modernisation go hand in hand at Reactor Institute Delft (RID)

In September, Reactor Institute Delft (RID) was visited by an INSARR mission (Integrated Safety Assessment for Research Reactors) from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In its report, the team of experts from the IAEA concluded that during a significant modernisation operation of the research reactor, safety was prioritised. The team also found areas requiring further enhancements, including the organisational structure and safety procedures and documentation.

30 September 2021

Nanobiology: ten years of merging disciplines

Nanobiology: ten years of merging disciplines

Almost ten years ago, Delft University of Technology and the Erasmus University Medical Centre launched the world’s first bachelor in Nanobiology, merging the scientific disciplines of biology, physics, and mathematics.

23 September 2021

A New Beam Multiplexer for NASA's GUSTO mission

A New Beam Multiplexer for NASA's GUSTO mission

GUSTO, NASA's stratospheric balloon observatory, will bring the Dutch multi-pixel camera system of SRON and TU Delft to the edge of space. It will perform a large-scale observation of the spectral lines from ionized atoms between the stars of the Milky Way. As an extra hardware contribution, SRON-TU Delft delivers a Fourier phase grating. The technique behind it is now published in Optics Express.

03 September 2021

Spinoza Prize for Lieven Vandersypen

Spinoza Prize for Lieven Vandersypen

NWO has announced that Professor Lieven Vandersypen (TU Delft/QuTech) has been awarded the Spinoza Prize, the highest award in Dutch Science.

02 September 2021

Stronger is not always better

Stronger is not always better

Rather than one key and one strong lock, biology often uses tens or hundreds of weaker links to bind parts together, such as cells membranes. This allows for selectivity and also reversibility: the binding can also be undone. Researcher Christine Linne and colleagues from Leiden University, TU Delft and Imperial College London first caught this phenomenon using spheres or colloids, and published September 1st in the journal PNAS.

30 August 2021

Catch me if you can: a revolutionary method to study single proteins

Catch me if you can: a revolutionary method to study single proteins

Researchers from the technical universities of Delft and Munich have invented a new type of molecular trap that can hold a single protein in place for hours to study its natural behavior – a million times longer than before.

26 August 2021

New CRISPR-Cas system cuts virus RNA

New CRISPR-Cas system cuts virus RNA

Researchers from the group of Stan Brouns (Delft University of Technology) have discovered a new CRISPR-Cas system that cuts RNA. The study will be published on August 26 in Science and is expected to offer many opportunities for the development of new applications in genetic research and biotechnology.

06 August 2021

New yeast species could make biotechnology more sustainable

New yeast species could make biotechnology more sustainable

Yeasts usually need oxygen to reproduce. However, researchers at TU Delft have now come across a highly unusual species of yeast that is capable of rapid growth even without oxygen. How does it do that? By replacing an essential component of the normal yeast cell with a surrogate molecule. In theory, this discovery could make the industrial production of beer and biofuels using yeasts more sustainable and efficient. The results of this study have been published in the scientific journal PNAS.

03 August 2021

Olympic Games update: four medals for our elite athletes

Olympic Games update: four medals for our elite athletes

Our elite athletes have performed magnificently, winning no fewer than four medals in total! Roos de Jong (rowing) and Annete Duetz (sailing) both won bronze and Stef Broenink (rowing) and Ellen Hogerwerg (rowing) won silver. The other elite athletes can also be proud of their results. Laila Youssifou (rowing) came in sixth, Victoria Pelova (football) played three matches in which she scored two goals, and Justen Blok (hockey) was included as a reserve player but was able to play two games after all.

29 July 2021

Kick-starting supersonic waves in antiferromagnets

Kick-starting supersonic waves in antiferromagnets

Atomically thin van der Waals magnets are widely seen as the ultimately compact media for future magnetic data storage and fast data processing. Controlling the magnetic state of these materials in real-time, however, has proven difficult. But now, an international team of researchers led by Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) has managed to use light in order to change the anisotropy of a van der Waals antiferromagnet on demand, paving the way to new, extremely efficient means of data storage.

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