Organisation

Research at TU Delft encompasses virtually the entire spectrum of engineering sciences and it is this breadth that forms the basis for TU Delft's strong scientific profile. The research questions we tackle are strongly inspired by important future challenges facing society.

How the research is positioned is determined by the source of the research question and the way in which that question is approached. Is it motivated by curiosity or with a view to potential utility? Researchers are often driven by curiosity, whereas society and the business community tend to me more concerned with utility. Research questions can be approached in a fundamental or pragmatic way.

Most research at TU Delft is positioned in the lower right-hand quadrant of the diagram above. In other words, it seeks to answer utility-driven questions in a fundamental way. Most of the research has a long time horizon, greater than eight years.

Science, Engineering, Design

Three key dimensions play an important role in our research: science, engineering and design. But the degree of emphasis placed upon each of these dimensions varies from discipline to discipline.

The technical and scientific knowledge acquired through our research activities feeds naturally into the education and knowledge valorisation at TU Delft. Equally, interaction with inquisitive and critical students, businesses and government agencies also results in new and unexpected research questions. In other words, research, education and knowledge valorisation inspire one another.

Who funds the research conducted at TU Delft?

Central government funding

The Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science funds much of the scientific research at TU Delft.

NWO - indirect funding

The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) funds high-level research at TU Delft.
In order to qualify for this funding, leading researchers at TU Delft must successfully compete against others across the Netherlands for the funds provided by the NWO. 

Contract funding from business

TU Delft also conducts contract research funded by Dutch and international businesses as well as the European Union. This funding takes the form of monetary or in-kind payments in return for the research conducted.

17 November 2017

Announcement from the Supervisory Board Nicoly Vermeulen new Vice President Operations

Nicoly Vermeulen is to become the new Vice President Operations (VPO) of the Executive Board TU Delft. The university's Supervisory Board has announced her appointment from 1 January 2018.

14 November 2017

Linda van der Spaa voted best graduate 3mE

On the 9th of november the Delft University Fund announced the 2017 Best Graduates of TU Delft. Each faculty has named their Best Graduate 2017, totalling a number of eight recently graduated cum laude students. On November 22nd, during the 2017 Best of TU Delft Award Ceremony, these Best Graduates will compete for the 2017 Best of TU Delft award. Faculty 3mE Linda Van der SPaa has been voted as best graduate student. The Faculty congratulates Linda with her nomination and wishes her the best of luck!

14 November 2017

Student team from TU Delft wins international Synthetic Biology competition

Students from TU Delft have won the International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) competition in Boston. Earlier this week, the team presented their idea for a quick, on-site method to demonstrate antibiotic resistance in bacteria in dairy cattle. The test would allow a farmer to adjust the treatment if resistant bacteria is detected, and reduce the unnecessary usage of antibiotics.

13 November 2017

Scanner for paintings turns out to be promising new CSI tool

In a special collaboration the TU Delft, the Rijksmuseum, the UvA en the NFI have introduced a new method for detecting ‘hard to find’ and concealed forensic traces. This work was officially published today in Nature’s open access journal Scientific Reports and is based on MA-XRF (i.e. scanning macro x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy) a technique originally developed for the elemental imaging of paintings and other works of art.

13 November 2017

Tourism and travel make Paris targets unachievable

In the year 2100, the world's population will be flying nine times as many kilometres as in 2015, and the average travel distance for all tourist journeys is set to double over the same period. Aviation, 90% of which is tourism, will not be able to escape a severe reduction in growth, or even no growth, if we are to meet the climate targets. This conclusion is drawn by Paul Peeters, who will be awarded his PhD for his thesis on this subject at TU Delft on Wednesday 15 November.