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29 November 2017

Radar satellites able to measure ‘water stress’ in trees

Radar technology in space can be used to measure how ‘thirsty’ plants and crops are. This could play a key role in improving our understanding of how ecosystems and the water and carbon cycles interrelate. In theory, we have the technology to monitor crops on a global scale and identify where remedial action is needed. On Friday 1 December, Tim van Emmerik will be awarded his PhD at TU Delft for his work on the subject.

13 November 2017

Tourism and travel make Paris targets unachievable

In the year 2100, the world's population will be flying nine times as many kilometres as in 2015, and the average travel distance for all tourist journeys is set to double over the same period. Aviation, 90% of which is tourism, will not be able to escape a severe reduction in growth, or even no growth, if we are to meet the climate targets. This conclusion is drawn by Paul Peeters, who will be awarded his PhD for his thesis on this subject at TU Delft on Wednesday 15 November.

11 September 2017

TU Delft researcher makes alcohol out of thin air

It may sound too good to be true, but TU Delft PhD-student Ming Ma (Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands) has found a way to produce alcohol out of thin air. Or, to be more precise, he has found out how to effectively and precisely control the process of electroreduction of CO2 to produce a wide range of useful products, including alcohol. Being able to use CO2 as a resource this way may just be pivotal in tackling climate change. His PhD defence will take place on September 14th.

13 July 2017

Earth evolving as seen from space

The trajectory calculations for satellite missions must be as accurate as possible – an area in which Dr Ernst Schrama and his colleagues have been experts for decades.

23 May 2017

Global mean sea level rise is accelerating faster than previously thought

Globally sea levels are on the rise. Now researchers from TU Delft and other European universities report a reconstruction of global mean sea level since 1902 that yields a slower average rise before 1990 than previously thought, but shows similar high rates as independent satellite observations from 1993-2012. This suggests that global mean sea level has been accelerating much faster than previously assumed in the past two decades. The results appear this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).