Research schools

02 December 2020

TU Delft software for determining contagion risk for specific locations

TU Delft professor of aerodynamics Fulvio Scarano, together with fluid mechanics expert Lorenzo Botto and simulation expert Wouter van den Bos, has developed software to calculate the risk of Covid-19 contagion at specific locations. The model virtually places a sick person in the space in question and simulates how quickly virus particles spread. The TU Delft researchers hope that designers will use the software to make predictions for determining whether an aircraft, classroom or restaurant, for example, is safe. The plug-in will probably become available in February.

01 December 2020

Delft researchers develop blood oxygenation sensor for premature babies

Doctors have to keep a close eye on babies that are born prematurely, and brain oxygenation is perhaps the most important thing to monitor. Up to 50 percent of premature babies suffer brain damage, leading to neurological problems. Researchers at Delft University of Technology have now developed a wireless sensor that monitors the health of the baby's brain in a simple, inexpensive and comfortable way for the child.

30 November 2020

Using artificial intelligence to solve arson offences

. In partnership with the Netherlands Forensic Institute (NFI), Thijs Vlugt, Mahinder Ramdin and Otto Moultos, researchers at the Department of Process & Energy, developed a new method using artificial intelligence that can be used to solve arson offences.

30 November 2020

3mE researchers partner in two NWA-ORC consortia

Researchers from TU Delft will work together in nine consortia with the entire knowledge chain and societal organisations, and conduct interdisciplinary research that will bring scientific and societal breakthroughs within reach. Faculty 3mE takes part in two consortia.

28 November 2020

Graphene balloons to identify noble gases

New research by scientists from Delft University of Technology and the University of Duisburg-Essen uses the motion of atomically thin graphene to identify noble gases. These gases are chemically passive and do not react with other materials, which makes it challenging to detect them. The findings are reported in the journal Nature Communications.