Thematic minor overview

Abbreviation studies
A+BE Architecture and the Built Environment
AE Aerospace Engineering
AES Applied Earth Sciences
AM Applied Mathematics
AP Applied Physics
CE Civil Engineering
CS&E Computer Science and Engineering
CSE Clinical Technology
EE Electrical Engineering
IDE Industrial Design Engineering
LST Life Science & Technology
MST Molecular Science & Technology
MT Marine Technology
TPMTechnology, Policy and Management
Abbreviation universities
LDE Leiden, Delft, Erasmus
LD Leiden, Delft
EUR Erasmus University Rotterdam
VU Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

On this page you will find a list of minors that will be offered during the 2020-2021 academic year.

Registration period for selection minors:
Leiden, Delft and Rotterdam and external students: 1 to 15 April 2020

Registration period for non-selection minors:
TU Delft students: 1 to 31 May 2020*
Leiden and Rotterdam students: 1 to 31 May 2020
External students: 1 to 31 May 2020

*For TU Delft students there is an additional registration period for places that become available on TU Delft minors. This period is from 15 to 30 June 2020.


44 results

Advanced Prototyping

Do you want to build functional, high-fidelity prototypes with the latest materials and digital fabrication techniques? The Advanced Prototyping Minor brings together the most recent agile manufacturing methods and emerging materials in creating functional high-fidelity prototypes. Prototypes are used in various design and engineering disciplines as an early version of a product or a system. They are built for a variety of purposes including to test an idea or concept (e.g., ‘proof-of-concept prototypes’), to represent certain aspects of an intended design (e.g., visual/ functional prototypes), and to trigger discussion in a multi-disciplinary design team (e.g., ‘boundary objects’). The course aims at equipping you with a wide range of advanced prototyping skills, techniques and materials to create prototypes, which capture both function and appearance of the intended design. To that aim, the course covers a broad interdisciplinary foundation, in-depth knowledge and practical skills, through (guest) lectures, hands-on workshops and multidisciplinary research/design projects. In addition to the knowledge and skills necessary for building prototypes, the course injects necessary critical and creative thinking to determine which of these techniques and when in the design process could be applied, by considering economics, feasibility, fidelity as well as environmental sensibility. The structure of the minor Advanced Prototyping is shaped around two knowledge/skill-building courses on digital fabrication and emerging materials , and a group project, which combines and applies the related knowledge and skills in the context of specific prototyping assignments. The minor offers: lectures and guided workshops on a variety of digital fabrication methods and materials processing collaboration with other disciplines, including engineering, science, arts, and design. access to the facilities/labs, including the Center for Design for Agile Manufacturing (CDAM), Digital Fabrication Lab (DiFaLab), Emerging Materials Lab, Material Incubator (Mi) wet lab and BioLab at Science Centre. Steel Bike The programme The minor Advanced Prototyping spans a full semester of 30 ECs. Inspirational lectures The minor starts with introductory lectures on prototyping theory, basic skill training and inspirational (guest) lectures on prototyping in practice. Knowledge/skill building courses The two courses Prototyping with/for Digital Fabrication (PDF) , and Prototyping with/for Emerging Materials (PEM) will run in parallel in Q1. These emphasise the role of these technologies and materials in prototyping advanced responsive, adaptive and/or ultra-personalised prototypes (i.e., prototyping with ), and the role of prototyping for showing the potential of these material and fabrication technologies (i.e., prototyping for ). In PDF course, you will be exposed to the theories, methods, and techniques on digitalisation, design automation and digital fabrication, including 3D scanning technologies, 3D modeling and parametric design tools (Rhino and Grasshopper), (multi-material) 3D printing, laser cutting, CNC milling. In PEM course, you will be exposed to the science and art of working with living materials (e.g. bacteria and fungi) in designing structural and responsive prototypes with these materials. Workshops To apply the learned skills and to reach concrete and assessable results, lectures are accompanied by small workshops. Advanced Prototyping project The obtained knowledge and skills in Q1 are synthesised in the Q2 course of Advanced Prototyping Project , through an iterative design process, aiming at building (multiple) prototype(s). In addition to constructing prototypes, you will be testing and evaluating the prototypes and eventually exhibiting both the process and the prototypes at a public venue (e.g., the main hall of IDE faculty). For whom? Advanced Prototyping Minor suits both design-oriented students with science/technology background and ‘science/technology’ oriented students with art/design background. The aim is to build project groups by combining students from these different backgrounds to create an environment in which students can reflect on the contribution of each discipline for advanced prototyping. Selection takes place by means of a random draw, based on the following formula: 1/2 from Industrial Design Engineering (TU Delft) 1/4 from Engineering disciplines (TU Delft) 1/4 other disciplines This allocation is done to meet the interdisciplinary nature of the minor. Minors of the faculty of Industrial Design Engineering are open only for students from academic programmes. Brochure Info and Enrollment For more general information on minors such as enrollment, selection and other minors go to main website of the TU Delft. Contact Industrial Design Engineering Willemijn Elkhuizen W.S.Elkhuizen@tudelft.nl

Airport of the Future Minor

The minor Airport of the Future is jointly organised by the faculties of Industrial Design Engineering (IDE), Civil Engineering and Geosciences (CEG), Technology, Policy and Management (TPM), and Aerospace Engineering (AE). The minor is aimed at engineering students from all bachelor programmes offered at TU Delft, who are interested in the design, planning, management and operational aspects of airports. Minor description Minor structure Learning goals Who is this minor for? How to register? Minor description An airport operates in a competitive, dynamic, complex, and unpredictable environment. Development and growth of any large airport is to a large extent determined by its ability to balance business realities, long-term expansion requirements, and environmental and social demands. The minor Airport of the Future is oriented to those engineering students who would like to understand how airports are designed, planned and operated in such a complex and uncertain environment. The issues confronting airports, both at the operational and strategic level, are truly multi-disciplinary in nature. The minor Airport of the Future is able to cover the entire multidisciplinary field of airport development, planning and operation through clustering of knowledge from various branches of science and technology available within the TU Delft. The minor focuses on the actual problems that can arise in airport design and operation, and on the practical effective ways to deal with them. Theory and methodology appear only to the extent that they are relevant and useful. Participating students need no specific experience or skills to successfully complete the minor. The domain of airport design, planning and operation involves a wide range of disciplines. By harnessing all of TU Delft’s expertise in the domain of airport development and operation, the full range of aspects can be covered within the minor in a comprehensive and coherent manner, including airport landside accessibility issues (CEG), passenger and baggage flows in an airport terminal (IDE), airside issues (AE) and logistics (TPM). Students participating in the minor will be exposed to the full array of multi-disciplinary issues, and will be part of a multi-disciplinary team, working together to produce “total solutions” for the key airport issues. In this sense, the minor Airport of Future provides an appealing opportunity to look beyond the boundaries of their own discipline. Minor structure The Minor (30EC) is composed of the following courses: Air Transportation (3EC) Airport Planning, Design and Operations (4 EC) Logistics 2 (5 EC) Landside accessibility of Airports (6 EC) Strategic Planning for Airport Systems (6 EC) Designing an Airport (6 EC) The minor code is LR-Mi-167-year Learning goals After successful completion of the minor program “Airport of the Future”, a student must be able to: Demonstrate understanding of the system concepts that address the technological, operational, logistic, economic, regulatory, safety, security and environmental problems associated with the development of airports. Implement and integrate regulatory requirements and adopted international airport design standards Understand and deconstruct the complex interrelationships and interactions among airport capacity, airport demand, policy changes, investments, and environmental issues and the effects that changes in any of these can have on airport profits and performance Structure and formulate problems related to the design of airport airside and landside facilities and logistic processes Deploy computer simulation software packages and information management systems used in industry in the planning and design of airports in order to generate and synthesize the information needed to support the decision making process Creatively solve problems in airport design, planning and operation Make informed tradeoffs among conflicting objectives and requirements of the various airport stakeholders and policy makers Judge the right balance between economic, environmental and social interests in sustainable airport development. Communicate, report and operate effectively as a member of a (multi-disciplinary) team Who is this minor for? The minor Airport Development is designed for all TU Delft students, and students from Leiden and Rotterdam in the following programs: Econometrics and Operational Research (EUR), Informatics & Economy, Molecular Science & Technology, Physics, Astronomy, and Mathematics. How to register? The registration for a minor takes place in two periods via OSIRIS. For more information about registration and application click below. Read More P.C. (Paul) Roling +31152785132 P.C.Roling@tudelft.nl 0 Brochure

Archineering

The minor Archineering focuses on materialisation as an essential part of any design product. In a number of intense and hands-on prototyping exercises more insight in the personal design process and integration of technology and design will be acquired in this minor. More experienced designer students will be able to improve themselves on specific aspects like Digital Fabrication and 3D printing. Students new in the field of architecture will explore and discover the fun of designing, sometimes even scale 1:1. Language: English Participating institutions: Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment Maximum participants: 30 Education methods: Design projects, workshops and research Selection minor: Yes, admissible TU Delft students will be selected based on their BSc programme to achieve an even interdisciplinary group. For whom? BSc students from TU Delft: all faculties. BSc students from Leiden University and Erasmus University: this minor is not open to students from Leiden University and Erasmus University. BSc students from other Dutch universities: students who would like to improve their design skills and delve deeper into the materialisation of their designs are asked to provide a small portfolio and CV to establish whether they have sufficient design skills and the right frame of reference. BSc students from HBO: HBO students who would like to improve their design skills and delve deeper into the materialisation of their designs are asked to provide a small portfolio and CV to establish whether you have sufficient design skills and the right frame of reference. This minor consists of 2 quarters (both of 15 ECs); each with a separate content. For students of the Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment TU Delft it is possible to follow either just quarter 1 or just quarter 2, or to follow both quarter 1 and 2. For all other students who are admissible to this minor, it is only possible to follow either quarter 1, or both quarter 1 and 2. Please be aware that each quarter has a separate minor code. If you would like to follow both quarter 1 and 2, you should register for both minor codes in Osiris. Archineering Quarter 1 Archineering Quarter 2 Minor code: BK-MI-203 What will you learn? In this minor you will work on a series of short design tasks and will learn to: foster design results, in which the relation between design and materialisation is a key theme; translate a design task in a complete and working draft proposal within 2 weeks; explore construction, climate design, digital manufacturing and detailing, and be able to experiment with these design aspects in your own design project; build, test and develop several prototypes and models on different information and scale levels. Course overview The programme consists of one course of 15 ECs. Archineering 1 (BK7460-13) For course descriptions, please visit the study guide . Minor code: BK-MI-204 What will you learn? In this minor you will work on one research & design task and will learn to: foster design results, in which the relation between design and materialisation is a key theme; translate a design task in a complete and technically engineered proposal; do research on the technology aspects: construction, climate design, digital manufacturing and detailing, and be able to experiment with these aspects in your own design project; build, test and develop several prototypes and models on different information levels and scale levels; Course overview The programme consists of one course of 15 ECs. Archineering 2 (BK7461) For course descriptions, please visit the study guide . Contact Ir. Roel van de Pas R.R.J.vandePas@tudelft.nl Students about this minor: "I really liked the fact that the first part of the minor consisted of many small design tasks; I was amazed I could produce so much in such a short time!" "With every assignment, I noticed it was easier to design." "I enjoyed learning so much more about the design process!" " After all the small assignments in Archineering//1, the nice thing was, you could totally deepen one subject to max in a large research & design assignment in Archineering//2." “By actually making something 1:1, you need to force yourself to understand it 100%, otherwise you can not construct it …” Register for this minor

Architecture Presentation - Visions Reviewed

The focus of this minor is the study of presentation techniques related to creative, visionary, and spatial projects. Case projects will be studied, re-presented and re-interpreted using a variety of techniques. The presentations will make urban, architectural, and landscape design concepts clear and imaginable. The presentation style will radiate the specific character of the design case project. During this minor, you will be able to experiment and practice a lot. The main goal is to develop a rich and various set of presentation skills. Minor code: BK-MI-198 Language : English Participating Faculties: Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment Maximum participants : 45 Education methods : Design projects, workshops, lectures and portfolio Selection minor: Yes, admissible TU Delft students will be selected based on their BSc programme to achieve an even interdisciplinary group. This minor will be held in the second quarter of the first semester and is comprised of three related courses with a total of 15 ECs. The minor can be studied as a stand-alone part, while it also combines very well with other Architecture related 15 ECs minors that are held during the first quarter of the semester. The minor focuses on analytical, expressive and reflective presentation skills. A number of remarkable case projects will be provided. Students work in small groups to analyse and develop individual skills, resulting in group presentations to represent and develop the project features. Not only the physical aspects of the project will be studied, but also style, societal context, ideas and ideals, and ethics and aesthetics. The three sub-courses all relate to the chosen case projects. The 3 ECs courses focus on presenting factual aspects and poetic or conceptual aspects of the projects. These courses serve as preparation to the larger 9 ECs course, in which you can choose your own course components. For example, you can choose to focus on photography, text, drawings or models, either by hand or in digital forms. This allows you to develop your skills in your own preferred ways, while you contribute to the combined final project exhibition. For whom? BSc students from TU Delft: BSc programme of Architecture, Urbanism and Building Sciences, Civil Engineering and Industrial Design. BSc students from Leiden University and Erasmus University: this is minor is not open to students from Leiden University. For students from Erasmus University only students from specific BSc programmes can participate (you can check this at www.minors.tudelft.nl ). BSc students from other Dutch universities: students with an interest in spatial design, the built environment, and presentation techniques, are asked to provide a portfolio and CV to establish whether they have sufficient design skills and the right frame of reference. BSc students from HBO: HBO students with an interest in spatial design, the built environment, and presentation techniques are asked to provide a portfolio and CV to establish whether they have sufficient design skills and the right frame of reference. What will you learn? After finishing this minor, you are able to: analyse and eloquently present a design project; visually present difficult concepts to an audience; research and develop comparisons metaphors and diagrams to clarify difficult concepts; compose images to illustrate concepts and ideas; communicate using models, images, schemes, technical drawings and infographics; make use of appropriate physical modelling techniques, materials, tools and instruments; express a project in either VR / AR / physical models / images or collages / text and in an exhibition; apply some enhanced imaging and modelling techniques, making scale models (choices in scale, material, colour, abstraction and detailing); apply various manufacturing techniques and photogrammetry. Course overview The minor is offered in the second quarter and consists of three courses with a total of 15 ECs. Presenting Project Facts (BK7140): 3 ECs Presenting Project Visions (BK7141): 3 ECs Presenting Project Prospects (BK7142): 9 ECs For course descriptions, please visit the study guide . Contact Mieke Vink M.G.Vink-1@tudelft.nl Peter Koorstra P.A.Koorstra@tudelft.nl Register for this minor

Cities, Migration & Socio-Spatial Inequality

International migration flows create a large array of integration challenges (language, education, employment, housing, social cohesion) in cities and neighbourhoods. Increasing population diversity coincides with growing socio-economic deprivation and patterns of socio-spatial segregation. Deepening divides and growing social inequality within and between cities and neighbourhoods are generally considered as undesirable and harmful towards life opportunities and social mobility of individual people. Increasing diversity also triggers questions in relation to national and urban identities, and even identities of neighbourhoods. This is reflected in the rise of populist parties and movements across Europe. Minor code: BK-MI-193 Language: English Participating institutions: Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment, Faculty of Social Sciences (Erasmus University Rotterdam), and the Faculty of Humanities (Leiden University) Maximum participants: 35 Education methods: Interactive lectures, literature review paper, research and strategy design (project team work), site visits, and interviews with professionals. Selection minor: Yes, admissible TU Delft students will be selected based on their BSc programme to achieve an even interdisciplinary group. Consequences of social inequality and diversity manifest themselves on the level of cities and neighbourhoods. These consequences pose challenges to the planning, (re)design and management of neighbourhoods, in particular housing, public space, and facilities. Consider for example the management and restructuring of declining urban neighbourhoods, redevelopment of vacant office buildings into temporary shelters, and (re)design of public space in ‘super-diverse’ areas. Such challenges cannot be solved with just design and engineering approaches. Understanding the intricate nature of socio-spatial inequality, migration and diversity in cities and neighbourhoods, and being able to develop planning, design and governance strategies requires a multi-, inter- or even trans-disciplinary perspective. This encompasses knowledge of international trends and developments, as well as geographical, sociological, planning and public administration perspectives on social inequality, spatial justice, migration, identity and diversity, their impact on urban and neighbourhood life, urban and neighbourhood design and their policy implications. For whom? This minor is intended for students who are highly motivated to develop an interdisciplinary perspective on socio-spatial inequality, spatial justice, migration, diversity, identity, and spatial design. You must have a passion for social scientific research and combine a strong academic curiosity with a determination to apply interdisciplinary knowledge in real-life situations of complex urban planning and design cases in the Netherlands. BSc students from TU Delft: BSc programme of Architecture, Urbanism and Building Sciences, Civil Engineering, Technology, Policy, and Management, and Industrial Design. BSc students from Leiden University and Erasmus University: students from Public Administration and Sociology at the Erasmus University and students following the interdisciplinary bachelor programme Urban Studies at Leiden University (Faculty of Humanities). For all BSc programmes from Leiden University and Erasmus University with which you can apply for this minor please check www.minors.tudelft.nl. BSc students from other Dutch universities: students with backgrounds in human geography or urban planning (Amsterdam, Nijmegen, Utrecht) and urban sociology (Amsterdam, Utrecht). BSc students from HBO: this minor is not open to HBO students. What will you learn? The CMSI-minor enables students to: develop an interdisciplinary perspective on socio-spatial inequality, spatial justice, migration, identity and diversity, including urban geography, sociology, urban planning and design, and public administration; acquire a methodological understanding which is essential to correctly analyse socio-spatial inequality, spatial justice, migration, identity and diversity and their consequences on various spatial levels; create (strategic) plans with socio-spatial strategies for intervention; assess the planning, governance and design implications of socio-spatial inequality, migration and diversity at the urban and neighbourhood level. The minor offers two additional (facultative) sessions that will offer students hands-on support with the writing and presenting elements in the minor, and will train students in presenting their review paper or project report. Course overview The programme consists of three interconnected courses with a total of 15 ECs and takes place in the first quarter. CMSI Lecture Series and Review Paper (BK7470): 6 ECs CMSI Collaborative Project ‘Tackling Spatial Inequality and Diversity’ (BK7471): 6 ECs CMSI Engaging with Practice (BK7472): 3 ECs For course descriptions, please visit the study guide . Contact Dr. Reinout Kleinhans R.J.Kleinhans@tudelft.nl Register for this minor

Companies and innovation

About the minor: Focus and aim The Minor ‘Companies and Innovation’ focuses on new (high-technology) product innovations within established companies, i.e. internal venturing or corporate entrepreneurship, by examining their potential values from diverse aspects such as economics, management, strategy, ethics, safety and risk. The requisite view is that companies are not isolated entities but are embedded in a social context with various values and expectations. Firstly, there are the markets a company is operating in, where the laws of economics rule: supply and demand, investment, financing and marketing. Secondly, there are restrictions (and opportunities!) set by the enforced rules of the law. For instance, the legislator may demand competition and forbid exclusive price arrangements requiring firms to think of their strategies, such as their intellectual property protection. Thirdly, there are considerations regarding safety or security and risk, that is, the safety (or security) of the product(s) the company produces, but also the safety of the employees involved in the production process and environmental safety. Finally, current opinions about what is ‘good’ and ‘immoral’ (or what is ‘responsible’ and ‘irresponsible’) determine the company’s ethical standpoint shaping its corporate social responsibility. The ability to integrate technological development with diverse values of firm strategies, market, ethics and safety is key to innovations in companies. In sum, an integrated insight into these distinct viewpoints is essential for companies to make sensible decisions and to develop new products that are both technologically and socially relevant and acceptable. The aim of the Minor is to offer students insights into how economics, strategic management, ethics, and safety and risk considerations impact innovation. This emphasis on multidimensional assessment of technological innovations within companies make the minor relevant, attractive and challenging for enterprising students, particularly technology-oriented students who would like to enhance their knowledge of management of innovation. More information Dr.ir. Z. Roosenboom-Kwee (Zenlin) +31 15 2784711 z.roosenboom-kwee@tudelft.nl Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management Minor code: MOT-MI-191 Language: English Access: All Maximum number of participants: 60 What do you learn? The main objectives of the minor are: Understand and apply the basic building blocks of innovation management in companies: Analyse organizational external business environment and internal business processes (e.g. financing), i.e. the ability to identify relevant organisational, technological and market factors that may positively and negatively influence innovation: Analyse and manage risk and safety (or security) issues that organizations have to deal with, e.g. product safety, occupational health and safety, privacy, etc.; Reflect on corporate responsibility of companies’ innovation (i.e. responsible innovation) from an ethical perspective; Apply knowledge and insights from course modules to solve a strategic management game; Study a socially responsible technological innovation within a company through a case study: i.e. develop, write and present a business plan of an innovative product within a company to an expert panel consisting of members of the business and academic community. The business plan should include market and business-economic analyses, strategic analyses, risk analyses and ethical reflections. Additionally, the minor provides students with: A broad view on economic, managerial, ethical and safety boundary conditions (within as well as outside a company) that provides limitations as well as incentives for companies to innovate; Practical project skills (e.g. cooperation and communication) as students work together as an interdisciplinary team on a solid business plan for an innovative product of their own choice; A basis for responsible innovation and entrepreneurship; Invaluable experience dealing with various experts in the field of safety and risk, economics/business, marketing, (strategic) management, and innovation. Overview of subjects Responsible management of risk and safety (5 ECTS) Strategic management game (4 ECTS) Innovation management (5 ECTS) Business economics, choice of technique and innovation (5 ECTS) Technology, innovation and ethics for companies (5 ECTS) Integration course (6 ECTS) Note: All courses will be given in English. Example previous case studies Sweeper: an efficient and effective system that works with integrated RFID tags in bicycle locks to trace stolen and lost stray bikes by bicycle companies Carrya: a lifting aid in the form of an exoskeleton for delivery services such as picnic Dynabuds: hearing protection that adaptively mutes sound, provides feedback in the event of a risk of hearing damage, and collects data from the user’s environment Sound Switch: a switch on your mobile phone that blocks the circuit of the microphone in the hardware of the device to prevent unwanted listening when it is not in use. Sun roofs in IKEA Netherlands, store H2 Development of a warmth grid in the Province of South Holland Smart city hubs that offer solutions for street lamps with wifi, spotting parking spots, and charging car Carbon capture and storage (CCS) in Tata Steel, sale of CO2 Sun Roofs for Long Parking Schiphol, charging electric busses Buffer energy in a “valmeer” (Plan Lievense 2.0) For whom? Enterprising and creative students who want to pursue their ventures or career in established firms, who want to understand how companies work, who want to apply their engineering skills to enhance safety and sustainability in a cost effective and responsible way; overall, students who wish to broaden their horizon.

Below you can filter by minors offered by each faculty:

English

All thematic minors at TU Delft are in English, with the exception of the following minors:

  • Educatie (Education)
  • Ondernemerschap (Entrepreneurship): Med-Tech Based Entrepreneurship
  • Ondernemerschap (Entrepreneurship): Technology Based Entrepreneurship