Although fundamentally different, government and industry are becoming increasingly dependent on each other in delivering on their goals and ambitions. This asks for ' Smart collaboration’: achieving satisfactory cooperation with sufficient understanding for each other's differences.
Public-private partnerships between a government agency and a private company can be set up to finance, build and manage projects. Financing a project via a public-private partnership can mean that the project is completed more quickly, or provide an opportunity to make a project possible at all.

Advanced Dutch Energy Materials innovation lab (ADEM)


Advanced Dutch Energy Materials innovation lab (ADEM) is both a research and an investment programme, led by prof. dr. Bernard Dam, and supervised by a 3TU/ECN Steering Committee and a Programme Board of industrial partners and government.

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The research focuses on solutions in the conversion, storage and transport of energy in six specific programmes. The shared Innovation Lab combines the experience of research and industrial partners with an infrastructure for energy research, materials and innovative product development.

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Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions (AMS)


Amsterdam Institute for Metropolitan Solutions (AMS Insitute) is an ambitious scientific institute located in Amsterdam. In this institute science, education, government, business partners and societal organisations are working tightly together to create solutions for the complex challenges a metropolitan region like Amsterdam is facing. The main activities of AMS Institute are related to research, data platform and education.

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The city of Amsterdam is the initiator and supporter of AMS Institute. The city and partners share urban data and Amsterdam allows the researchers to use her city as a living lab and testbed. The public and private partners are amongst others TNO, Amsterdam Smart City, The Waag Society, City of Boston, KPN, Accenture, Alliander, Cisco, ESA, IBM, Shell, AEB, Deltares, the Port of Amsterdam and Waternet.

Together with Wageningen University and MIT, TU Delft forms the academic heart of the AMS initiative. We work closely together with AMS in various research and educational projects.

To the AMS website

Biotechnology based Ecologically Balanced Sustainable Industrial Consortium (BE-Basic)


BE-Basic Foundation has been created to combine industrial biotechnology with ecological and environmental biotechnology already a decade ago. Over the past years, BE-Basic and its 50+ partners worked hard to investigate, develop and test industrial biobased solutions to build a sustainable society. BE-Basic brings together the best scientists, experts and commercial companies in the Netherlands to develop those innovations. The spectrum of activities has expanded considerably due to our national alliances with industry and governments, particularly in Europe, South and North America and South-East Asia.

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BE-Basic’s focus is on integral and sustainable biobased solutions, that balance and optimize economic value and climate impact for non-energetic (chemicals, materials, food & feed) and energetic (transportation fuels, power/heat) uses. Those balances are best reached by applying cascading and integral biorefinery concepts and prioritize energetic uses for those sectors without alternatives (aviation, marine and heavy road transport) (www.be-basic.org).


Bioprocess Pilot Facility


In the coming decades, we must transition from an economy based on fossil raw materials to one that uses biomass as raw material. Not only is this critical to the environment, we are running out of fossil raw materials. In the Bioprocess Pilot Facility (BPF), new sustainable production processes can be scaled up and tested. 

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The step from laboratory scale to industrial scale is not easy. Process conditions and raw materials must be extensively tested first. That requires complex installations that many companies cannot afford. That is why universities, businesses and governments joined hands to realize this facility 

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Catalysis for Sustainable Chemicals from Biomass (CatchBio)


CatchBio has initiated an ambitious 8-year research programme in the field of catalytic biomass conversion. Its aim is to process the various components present in biomass (cellulose, hemi-cellulose, lignin, proteins and oils) into useful fuels, chemicals and pharmaceuticals. The socio-economical and ethical aspects of the various technological options generated will also be investigated.

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CatchBio aims to develop clean and efficient processes for biomass conversion into low-cost and sustainable biofuels, chemicals and pharmaceuticals. This requires new technologies and an understanding of the problems with durability that go hand in hand with this change.

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Dutch Optics Centre


The Dutch Optics Centre is an initiative by TNO and TU Delft aimed at boosting  Dutch industry in the field of optics and optomechatronics by making better use of Dutch science through joint R&D.

The Dutch Optical Centre is the National Centre in the field of optics and opto-Mechatronics.

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Holland PTC


HollandPTC is the independent clinic and research centre within which the TU Delft, the Leiden University Medical Centre and the Erasmus Medical Centre collaborate on excellent care and cutting-edge research. 

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HollandPTC will treat patients with complex oncology as from the autumn of 2017. The Centre aims to be one of the world’s leading institutes in the field of proton therapy.

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Human Disease Model Technology (hDMT)


The Institute for human Organ and Disease Model Technologies (hDMT) investigates organ and disease models on chips. 

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TU Delft, one of the founders of hDMT, already managed to make a flexible chip on which a living heart cell can be posted, and which can actually beat. The organs-on-a-chip technology helps us better understand the functioning of organs and can speed up drug research, for example..

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Quantum Computer en internet (QuTech)


The ideas behind the quantum computer  fascinate not only scientists but also the general public. Quantum theory describes how an object can be in two places at the same time ("superposition") and how two separate objects can be connected ("entanglement"), phenomena that are hard to imagine in our daily lives. 

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Unprecedented scientific progress has now ensured that scientists can control these quantum phenomena even better. Fascinating future visions, such as quantum teleportation and quantum computers are closer than ever.

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RoboValley


Being at the forefront of the development of robotics has several advantages. Next to economic growth, the most important consideration is that this new generation of robotics can contribute to addressing major societal problems. Climate change, aging societies, a growing world population and food shortages: these are all issues which can be solved by robotics.

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The RoboValley programme team helps companies or start-ups that want to settle in Delft. We do so by connecting companies with automation wishes to the right experts. We help attract investors: via the RoboValley Investment Fund, we offer venture capital and accelerated paths to the market for the most promising robotics technologies.

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The Green Village


Solving the world's biggest challenges requires radical new connections – combinations of technologies that have never before been linked to each other or innovation partnerships between unlikely partners.

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These connections lead to radical innovations, for example, cars that provide houses with power, people who produce their own drinking water, and buildings that are becoming increasingly like computers.

While ideas are inspiring, the development and implementation of these innovations are extremely complex, raising questions about different topics which are closely connected: technology (how do we let it work?), business models (how do we make something economically attractive?), public interest (which opportunities and what care are available in society) and regulation (if society wants this, how can we allow it?).

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VPDelta


VPdelta stimulates innovation on three themes: Safe Delta, Urban Delta and Smart Delta.

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The Valorisation programme Delta technology, commonly known as VPdelta, has been in existence since 2012 and is currently in its second phase (2016-2019). Within national and international experimental proofs, partners showcase and develop pilot projects in the public sector to seek solutions for delta issues.

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