Faculty of Applied Sciences

15 February 2018

Programming on a silicon quantum chip

Quantum technology makes a great leap forward. While scientists can control a few qubits with great reliability, it doesn’t yet look like a real computer. Useful quantum chips require programmability: the ability to perform an arbitrary set of operations. Scientists from QuTech in Delft have now realised a programmable two-qubit quantum processor in silicon successfully implementing two quantum algorithms. They have published their work in the magazine Nature.

15 February 2018

Virtual tour of the catalysis lab

The new industrial catalysis lab is still under construction, but a few colleagues were already able to go for a walk inside the building last Monday. In 3D virtual reality, that is. A nice and very useful experience, as it turned out!

07 February 2018

Mathematics explains why Crispr-Cas9 sometimes cuts the wrong DNA

The discovery of the Cas9 protein has been of great value to medical science. It has simplified gene editing tremendously, and may even make it possible to eliminate many hereditary diseases in the near future. Using Cas9, researchers have the ability to cut DNA in a cell to correct mutated genes, or paste new pieces of genetic material into the newly opened spot. Initially, the Crispr-Cas9 system seemed to be extremely accurate. But unfortunately, it is now apparent that Cas9 sometimes also cuts other DNA sequences similar to the exact sequences it was programmed to target. Scientists at Delft University of Technology have developed a mathematical model that explains why Cas9 cuts some DNA sequences while leaving others alone.

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