Thematisch minor-aanbod

Het aanbod voor 2023-2024 is beschikbaar per maart 2023.

 

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Op deze pagina vind je het minor-aanbod van 2022-2023.

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Climate Change, Adaptation and Mitigation

CT-MI-226 Climate change is arguably the most severe challenge that our planet is facing the 21st century. Human interference is perturbing the climate system through emissions of greenhouse gases, changes in aerosol concentrations and changes in land use. Climate science aims to estimate how the climate is changing in the near and more distant future and its impact on our living and build environment. Engineering solutions are required to cope with the evolving climate change impacts (adaption) and to prevent further emissions (mitigation). In addition, even more drastic solutions might be needed design to undo the already committed climate changes (climate engineering). Check all TU Delft minors Introduction to Climate Change Illustration of a cloud-brightening process by a ship that sprays salt particles into the air to reflect sunlight to slow global warming. Science Fiction or a Climate Engineering Possibility? Minor code: CT-MI-226 Language: English For students: All TU Delft BSc students as well as bachelor students from other universities with a basic background in physics and mathematics who are interested in the scientific, engineering, socio-economical and political aspects of climate change. Max. number of participans: 50 Non-selection minor: Selection minor: For Whom? All TU Delft BSc students, students from other universities with a basic background in physics and mathematics What will you learn? The multifaceted scientific, engineering, socio-economical and political aspects of climate change. Course overview Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Education methods Lectures and projects Register for this minor Visit the minor page for more information about registration Contact Contact details For whom? All TU Delft BSc students as well as batchelor students from other universities with a basic background in physics and mathematics who are interested in the scientific, engineering, socio-economical and political aspects of climate change. What will you learn During this minor you will get engaged in the multifaceted scientific, engineering, socio-economical and political aspects of climate change. From a climate science perspective, you will get an overview of the Earth’s climate system, learn how it is perturbed by human interference and discuss the consequences for the present and future climate. The impacts of climate change on humans and the build environment will be discussed: How is the delta where we live in affected by climate change through sea level rise, soil subsidence, changes in precipitation, river discharges, draughts, flooding and salt intrusion? Adaption, mitigation and climate engineering measures are a central part in this minor. Which engineering solutions (adaptations) can we design to cope with these changes? What are the possibilities and limitations of mitigation measures to meet the emission reduction requirements? And can we construct climate engineering solutions to undo the already committed climate change? Parallel to these engineering possibilities, the mitigation and adaptation options will also be analysed from an socio-economical and political perspective: how can we make engineering solutions feasible from a economical and acceptable from a social perspective. As a result, this minor will enable you to develop a broad view on climate change and its consequences and will be of great value for any specialisation later later on in your educational journey. After this minor the student: has developed a basic understanding of climate physics and climate predictions, is familiar with the different sources of uncertainties in todays’ climate predictions, and can explain the impact of climate change on humans and the natural and build environment. understands the effectiveness and limitations of climate adaptation options being considered; recognises the options to mitigate climate change, knows how to characterise them, and understands how they interact; can assess climate adaptation and mitigation measures from an economical perspective. Is able to assess the risk and probability of a certain manifestation of climate change; is able to design adaptation, mitigation and climate engineering strategies for specific cases along with political and economic implementation analyses. Course overview Quarter 1 During quarter 1 (Q1), 3 courses are offered: CT3080 The Science of Climate Change (5 EC) (4 EC lecture, 1 EC project/Assignment) CT3081 Climate Change Impact and Adaptation ( 5EC) (4 EC lecture, 1 EC project/Assignment) CT3082 Mitigation of Climate Change ( 5EC) (4 EC lecture, 1 EC project/Assignment) Quarter 2 During the first half of the 2nd quarter (Q2), 2 courses are offered: CT3083 Climate Engineering (4 EC) (3 EC lecture, 1 EC project) CT3084 Political Economy of Climate Change (5 EC) (4 EC lecture, 1 EC project) During the second half of the 2nd quarter (Q2) you will be working on you end-project (6 EC). CT3085 End-Project (6 EC) Contact Pier Siebesma Professor +31 15 27 85628 A.P.Siebesma@tudelft.nl Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences Building 23 Stevinweg 1 / PO box 5048 2628 CN Delft / 2600 GA Delft Room number: 2.15

Delta Expert, Water for the Future

CT-MI-166 As a “Delta Expert”, you’ll know about what is going on in the field of water studies across the globe. You’ll not only learn about the Dutch Delta Programme, but also about other deltas in the world. You’ll undertake a field trip to neighbouring countries and gain a broad knowledge base. Together with water experts, you’ll study hydraulic structures, water treatment and water resources management from an interdisciplinary perspective. You’ll get to design and build your own measuring sensor that focuses on a typical feature of water, and you’ll finish the minor with a research project of your choice. Check all TU Delft minors Measuring Water on TUDelft TV Introduction video about this minor Lecturer Rolf Hut in 'The Wereld Draait Door' Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences Minor code: CT-MI-166 Language: English Max. Participants: 35 Non-selection minor: Selection minor: For Whom? All TU Delft BSc students National and international students who wish to learn about water issues What will you learn? Through introductory courses, you’ll learn about a wide variety of disciplines relating to water issues. Course overview See the digital Study guide for a list of courses and their contents Education methods Lectures, projects Register for this minor Visit the minor page for more information about registration Contact Student stories and contact details For whom? All TU Delft BSc students National and international students who wish to learn about water issues or specialise in water issues at a later stage What will you learn Through introductory courses, you’ll learn about a wide variety of disciplines relating to water issues. Through excursions and by talking to experts, you’ll learn about key water-related issues. You’ll learn about measuring water characteristics and will get to make your own measurement device. In the research project, you’ll gain in depth-knowledge on a topic of your choice. Contact Erik Mostert Assistant professor +31 15 27 87800 e.mostert@tudelft.nl Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences Building 23 Stevinweg 1 2628 CN Delft Room: 4.82 Matthieu de Schipper Assistant professor +31 (0)15-2787692 M.A.deSchipper@tudelft.nl Room: 3.68 Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences Delft University of Technology Presence: Mon - Fri Student experience "In this minor, you can choose your own research topic. I liked the fact that this was the first time that I did a research project to get results, not a mark. Several experts offered their expertise. I was really lucky that I was able to do research in Zambia and I had the opportunity to publish the results in an article." Bart van Osnabrugge Challenges Do you know how often water has been drunk before you drink it? Do you know why the Dutch river problem lies in Germany? What can we learn from the Mississippi Delta?