Imaging Physics

     

The Department of Imaging Physics (ImPhys) focuses on developing novel, sometimes revolutionary, instruments and imaging technologies. These research products extend existing boundaries in terms of spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and information/data throughput. We are pioneers in developing advanced concepts of computational imaging, a marriage between cleverly designed imaging systems and sophisticated post-processing. 

ImPhys’s profile encompasses a mix of science, engineering and design. While the spectrum of imaging physics is very broad, we focus on a few key fields where we generate impact: Life sciences, Healthcare and High tech industry.

Imaging Physics

The Department of Imaging Physics (ImPhys) focuses on developing novel, sometimes revolutionary, instruments and imaging technologies.

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These research products extend existing boundaries in terms of spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and information/data throughput. We are pioneers in developing advanced concepts of computational imaging, a marriage between cleverly designed imaging systems and sophisticated post-processing. 

ImPhys’s profile encompasses a mix of science, engineering and design. While the spectrum of imaging physics is very broad, we focus on a few key fields where we generate impact: Life sciences, Healthcare and High tech industry.

Latest News

30 november 2016

NWO ECHO Project Jacob Hoogenboom approved

Title: "Optimized electron-molecule interactions for near-molecular resolution light and electron microscopy". The researchers propose a novel approach: fluorescence microscopy using a beam of energetic electrons. This will allow measuring molecular positions in the structural landscape at electron microscopy resolution. Their approach is enabled by two unconventional steps: (i) Fluorescent molecules will be excited in an electron microscope using low-energy (1-50eV) electrons, probing resonant and near-resonant intramolecular excitation regimes. (ii) Encouraged by recent initial observations of electron-excited fluorescence from green fluorescent protein (GFP) under vacuum, will optimize fluorescent proteins for fluorescence microscopy with focused electron beams. Thus, we will enable electron-excited fluorescence from organic fluorescent molecules commonly used as bio-molecular labels for immuno-targeting, as well as from optimized fluorescent proteins.

30 november 2016

NWO Building Blocks project Jacob Hoogenboom approved

Research project title: "Defining molecular and cellular modulators of cancer immunotherapy by automated high throughput 3D light-electron microscopy". The main goal of the researchers is to identify fundamental mechanisms by which tumor cells modulate their environment to prevent their destruction by the immune system. They will develop state-of-the art microscopy tools to obtain an integrated view on the molecular and cellular factors that affect the behavior of individual immune cells in a 3D mouse model of breast cancer. The results will be of relevance for cancer immunotherapy and establish new microscopy tools.

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