Research

Our scientific disciplines

Atmospheric Science

The atmospheric science group studies physical processes in the atmosphere that have a strong impact on daily life, such as clouds, fog, precipitation, low-level winds, air quality, and more. We use a large variety of observation and modeling tools, such as atmospheric profiling with radar, lidar and met towers, high resolution simulation and conceptual models. To apply our knowledge, we work closely with the weather prediction, climate and renewable energy community.

Earth System Science

The Earth System is made of four components interacting with each other: biosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and lithosphere. At GRS we investigate the Earth System and its components through remote sensing, in-situ observations and models to quantify, explain and predict changes in climate and environment, such as sea level change, ice sheet and glacier change, hydrological cycle change, land use change, surface deformation, etc. 

Geodesy

The challenge of the geodesy group is to monitor planet Earth from a geometrical and physical perspective. We detect when ice sheets are melting, how vehicles move, or how infrastructure changes due to natural or man-made causes. We do this by developing new observation techniques, where space technology plays an important role. In general, geodesists are experts in observation science, data analytics, and know how to work with big data. Geodesy is essential for all the engineering sciences, and we collaborate closely with industry (energy, infrastructure, transport, water, construction), government (security and safety), and with other scientific disciplines (climate, environment, computational science).

Remote Sensing

For example, we work on processing techniques to study the microphysics of rain using weather radar data; investigate methodologies to measure millimeter-scale surface deformation using satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data; use laser-scanning data to construct dynamic 3-D point-cloud models of our environment; or study melting processes in Antarctic outflow glaciers by combining optical and radar data. At GRS we investigate the Earth System and its components through remote sensing, in-situ observations and models to quantify, explain and predict changes in climate and environment, such as sea level change, ice sheet and glacier change, hydrological cycle change, land use change, surface deformation, etc. 

Atmospheric Science

The atmospheric science group studies physical processes in the atmosphere that have a strong impact on daily life, such as clouds, fog, precipitation, low-level winds, air quality, and more. We use a large variety of observation and modeling tools, such as atmospheric profiling with radar, lidar and met towers, high resolution simulation and conceptual models. To apply our knowledge, we work closely with the weather prediction, climate and renewable energy community.

Earth System Science

The Earth System is made of four components interacting with each other: biosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and lithosphere. At GRS we investigate the Earth System and its components through remote sensing, in-situ observations and models to quantify, explain and predict changes in climate and environment, such as sea level change, ice sheet and glacier change, hydrological cycle change, land use change, surface deformation, etc. 

Geodesy

The challenge of the geodesy group is to monitor planet Earth from a geometrical and physical perspective. We detect when ice sheets are melting, how vehicles move, or how infrastructure changes due to natural or man-made causes. We do this by developing new observation techniques, where space technology plays an important role. In general, geodesists are experts in observation science, data analytics, and know how to work with big data. Geodesy is essential for all the engineering sciences, and we collaborate closely with industry (energy, infrastructure, transport, water, construction), government (security and safety), and with other scientific disciplines (climate, environment, computational science).

Remote Sensing

For example, we work on processing techniques to study the microphysics of rain using weather radar data; investigate methodologies to measure millimeter-scale surface deformation using satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data; use laser-scanning data to construct dynamic 3-D point-cloud models of our environment; or study melting processes in Antarctic outflow glaciers by combining optical and radar data. At GRS we investigate the Earth System and its components through remote sensing, in-situ observations and models to quantify, explain and predict changes in climate and environment, such as sea level change, ice sheet and glacier change, hydrological cycle change, land use change, surface deformation, etc. 


Stories of Science