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Queen Máxima and European Commissioner Mariya Gabriel visit Delft researchers and innovations

During an elaborate tour on the campus, Her Majesty Queen Máxima and the European Commissioner for Innovation, Research, Culture, Education and Youth, Mariya Gabriel today were introduced to several scientists and innovations from TU Delft. During the talks, the focus was on improving the journey of scientific innovations before they can be used in society. Synthetic cell The visit started at the Faculty of Applied Sciences, where professor Marileen Dogterom gave the group a guided tour through the labs of the Bionanoscience department. Scientists of the European Synthetic Cell Initiative spoke about their research into the smallest building blocks of cells. They are trying to find out exactly how these building blocks work, with the ambition of being able to make the first working synthetic cell. Living lab Next, led by director Marjan Kreijns, the group made a walk through The Green Village, a living lab on the TU Delft campus. In this living lab, innovations for making the built environment more sustainable are tested. The houses within the village are actually inhabited, so that new energy transition and climate adaptation technologies can immediately be adjusted to the needs of residents. Innovation ecosystem This was followed by a round-table discussion about science and innovation. Innovation at TU Delft is realized within the innovation ecosystem around the university, consisting of businesses, research institutions and field labs. Delft entrepreneurs shared their experiences of entrepreneurship; Delft scientists talked about the relationship between their research and its path to society. Rector Magnificus Tim van der Hagen concludes: “Great to see that examples from Delft practice can in this way contribute to increase the impact of science at the European level.” Quantum computer The visit ended with a tour of QuTech, led by Professor Lieven Vandersypen. QuTech is the Delft research institute where scientists are working on developing scalable prototypes of a quantum computer and a secure quantum internet. These promising techniques have major implications for the digital society of the future. In the lab, the group spoke with scientists, and also with the founders of Delft-based start-ups that are already working with the latest quantum techniques. More information Dimmy van Ruiten, press officer TU Delft, 015 27 81588, D.M.vanRuiten@tudelft.nl

Caspar Chorus appointed Dean of Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering (IDE)

The Executive Board has appointed Professor Caspar Chorus as Dean of the Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering (IDE) as of 1 September 2022. He is currently chair of the Engineering Systems and Services department at the Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management (TPM). Caspar Chorus studied Systems Engineering & Policy Analysis at TU Delft, where in 2007 he was awarded a doctorate with distinction (cum laude) for his research on the role of travel information in mobility choice behaviour. After two years at Eindhoven University of Technology, he returned to TU Delft in 2008. In 2014 he was appointed Professor of Choice Behaviour Modelling. From 2013 to 2018 he was head of the Transport & Logistics section; since 2019 he is head of the Engineering Systems and Services department. Professor Chorus’ research focuses on the mathematical modelling of choice behaviour. Among others, he developed the so-called regret model, an econometric model based on the idea that we base our choices on avoiding regret afterwards. It was a scientific breakthrough in that it offered an alternative to the widely used utility maximisation model; the regret model has since been included in various econometric software packages. He went on to integrate other insights from the behavioural sciences into choice models, such as models of moral choice behaviour. Models of human choice behaviour can help public authorities and businesses to design better policies and strategies. They can also aid the design of human-centred Artificial Intelligence based on human preferences and values. Chorus has brought his scientific insights to the market as co-founder and scientific advisor of spin-off Councyl. Councyl helps organisations to digitise their expertise in order to support their decision-making. He has received several international awards for his research and received funding by means of Veni and Vidi grants from Dutch Research Council NWO and an ERC Consolidator Grant. In addition, Chorus won several awards for his teaching and his supervision of PhD candidates. Professor Chorus succeeds Professor Ena Voûte, who has led the faculty for ten years. As of 1 September, she will largely devote herself to her new position of Pro Vice Rector for International Affairs.

Dutch knowledge institutions suspend partnerships with Russia and Belarus

The Dutch universities are shocked by the Russian invasion of Ukraine and all Dutch knowledge institutes have decided to suspend all formal and institutional partnerships with educational and knowledge institutions in the Russian Federation and Belarus immediately until further notice. They did this in response to the urgent appeal of the Minister of Education, Culture and Science. 

Read more on Universities of the Netherlands 🡕

Current


Dutch knowledge institutions suspend partnerships with Russia and Belarus

The Dutch universities are shocked by the Russian invasion of Ukraine and all Dutch knowledge institutes have decided to suspend all formal and institutional partnerships with educational and knowledge institutions in the Russian Federation and Belarus immediately until further notice. They did this in response to the urgent appeal of the Minister of Education, Culture and Science. 

Read more on Universities of the Netherlands 🡕
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