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22 August 2017

Free online course (MOOC) Observation Theory: Estimating the Unknown

Are you an engineer, scientist or technician? Are you dealing with measurements or big data, but are you unsure about how to proceed? This is the course that teaches you how to find the best estimates of the unknown parameters from noisy observations. You will also learn how to assess the quality of your results.

16 August 2017

Best lecturer 2016-2017: Dr. Roderik Lindenbergh

18 July 2017

Bas van de Wiel appointed Professor of Atmospheric Physics

TU Deft has appointed Bas van de Wiel as Professor of Atmospheric Physics. This is an Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (AvL) position, intended to accelerate the promotion of excellent scientists to professor so that they can develop their academic careers to the fullest.

17 July 2017

Trends and interannual variability of mass and steric sea level in the Tropical Asian Seas

In the study we have separated, for the first time, the contributions of mass and steric sea level to trends and interannual variability in the Tropical Asian Seas (TAS) over eight years by a statistically weighting the measurements of satellite altimetry, satellite gravimetry and ocean reanalysis estimates.

02 June 2017

PhD candidate Olga Didova receives IAG Young Author Award 2016

The IAG Young Author Award 2016 is given to Olga Didova for her paper “An approach for estimating time-variable rates from geodetic time series”, which has been published in the Journal of Geodesy (2016) 90:1207-1221. The paper is co-authored by Brian Gunter, Riccardo Riva, Roland Klees, and Lutz Roese-Koerner representing 3 different scientific institutions.

23 May 2017

Global mean sea level rise is accelerating faster than previously thought

Globally sea levels are on the rise. Now researchers from TU Delft and other European universities report a reconstruction of global mean sea level since 1902 that yields a slower average rise before 1990 than previously thought, but shows similar high rates as independent satellite observations from 1993-2012. This suggests that global mean sea level has been accelerating much faster than previously assumed in the past two decades. The results appear this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

23 May 2017

Global mean sea level rise is accelerating faster than previously thought

Globally sea levels are on the rise. Now researchers from TU Delft and other European universities report a reconstruction of global mean sea level since 1902 that yields a slower average rise before 1990 than previously thought, but shows similar high rates as independent satellite observations from 1993-2012. This suggests that global mean sea level has been accelerating much faster than previously assumed in the past two decades. The results appear this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

23 May 2017

Global mean sea level rise is accelerating faster than previously thought

Globally sea levels are on the rise. Now researchers from TU Delft and other European universities report a reconstruction of global mean sea level since 1902 that yields a slower average rise before 1990 than previously thought, but shows similar high rates as independent satellite observations from 1993-2012. This suggests that global mean sea level has been accelerating much faster than previously assumed in the past two decades. The results appear this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

17 May 2017

Second annual poster session

On Friday, the department pf Geoscience and Remote Sensing hosted its second annual poster session. With 37 posters in total, it was a great success!

09 May 2017

COOL DOWN THE PLANET: Crowd Engineering as a new instrument against climate change

Cool Down The Planet aims to bring students, scientists and ‘the crowd’ from all over the planet together in annual online open competitions in an effort to combat global warming. From 12 to 30 June 2017 a pilot project will be running on www.cooldowntheplanet.nl. Several dozen students and experts are being sought, who will spend three weeks on this platform finding a solution to a specific question, in this case: Can we mitigate global warming using sustainable offshore ‘cloud factories’? Cool Down The Planet is sponsored by TU Delft and makes use of expertise from scientists from the TU Delft Climate Institute.