Flying-V

Flying long distances energy-efficiently

Flying-V

Flying long distances energy-efficiently

Flying-V

Flying long distances energy-efficiently

The Flying-V is a design for a highly energy-efficient long-distance aeroplane. The aircraft’s design integrates the passenger cabin, the cargo hold and the fuel tanks in the wings, creating a spectacular v-shape. Its improved aerodynamic shape and reduced weight will mean it uses 20% less fuel than the Airbus A350, today’s most advanced aircraft. 

In the Flying-V – originally an idea of TU Berlin student Justus Benad during his thesis project at Airbus Hamburg – the passenger cabin, cargo hold and fuel tanks are integrated in its wing structure. The design is not as long as an Airbus A350, but it has the same wing span. This allows the Flying-V to use the present infrastructure at airports, such as gates and runways. The Flying-V carries about the same number of passengers -  314 in the standard configuration – and the same amount of cargo, 160 m3. Project leader at TU Delft, Dr. Roelof Vos: “The Flying-V is smaller than the A350 and has less inflow surface area compared to the available amount of volume. The result is less resistance. That means the Flying-V needs less fuel for the same distance.”

Flying scale model

Lead engineer Malcom Brown’s team of engineers, technicians and students built a scale model with a wing span of 3.06 metres. This model will be flown later this year to measure its stability when flying at low speeds and to calculate the right angle for take-off and landing.

Stretching out in economy class

Professor of Applied Ergonomics and Design Peter Vink and industrial design engineer Thomas Rotte made the designs for the new, oval shaped cabin. The Flying-V can be fitted with a traditional cabin, but Vink and Rotte designed an experimental cabin that is lightweight, comfortable for passengers and that still holds the same number of passengers as an Airbus A350. It contains four different seating options: lounge chairs, group seating, individual seats and collapsible beds.

Stretching out in economy class

Professor of Applied Ergonomics and Design Peter Vink and industrial design engineer Thomas Rotte made the designs for the new, oval shaped cabin. The Flying-V can be fitted with a traditional cabin, but Vink and Rotte designed an experimental cabin that is lightweight, comfortable for passengers and that still holds the same number of passengers as an Airbus A350. It contains four different seating options: lounge chairs, group seating, individual seats and collapsible beds.

Flying on sustainable energy

The Flying-V is one of TU Delft's lines of research into making aviation more sustainable. Dean Henri Henri Werij: "Ultimately, we have to fly entirely on sustainable energy. CO2-neutral. If CO2 is still released during the flight, for example because we then fly on synthetic kerosene, the same amount of CO2 will be used to produce those fuels. At Delft University of Technology, we are investigating how we are going to achieve this. For example, we are investigating new forms of propulsion, such as electric and electric hybrid, the climate impact of aviation and air traffic operations, such as airports.

Wingspan:
65 metres
Length:
55 metres
Height:
17 metres
Length:
55 metres
Wingspan:
65 metres
Height:
17 metres
Number of passengers:
314
Cargo:
160 m³
Fuel:
140.000 litres of kerosene
Fuel efficiency (compared to Airbus A350-900)
20% less fuel

Involved at the TU Delft:

More information:

About the aircraft design and the scale model (faculty of Aerospace Engineering): 
Roelof Vos, researcher Flight Performance and Propulsion: +31 (0)15 278 5643
Ineke Boneschansker, communication manager: +31 (0)15 278 5361   

About the cabin design and passenger experience (faculty of Industrial Design Engineering): 
Thomas Rotte, industrial design engineer; by phone through department secretariat: +31 (0)15 278 2625.
Marc de Kool, press officer: +31 (0)15 278 3723, 

Press office TU Delft: +31 (0)15 278 9111.