Research News

950 results

11 January 2022

ERC Starting Grants for two 3mE projects

ERC Starting Grants for two 3mE projects

Sabina Caneva and Richard Norte, researchers of the department of Precision and Microsystems Engineering, have been awarded an ERC Starting Grant by the European Research Council.

16 December 2021

City Deal Openbare Ruimte

City Deal Openbare Ruimte

13 December 2021

TU Delft collaborates on development of Amsterdam data heat network

TU Delft collaborates on development of Amsterdam data heat network

TU Delft is launching – in collaboration with infrastructure specialist Firan, the City of Amsterdam and the AMS Institute – the ‘Digital Heat’ project in the Metropolitan Region of Amsterdam (MRA). The goal is to develop a future-proof low temperature heat network in Amstel III Zuid using residual heat from a nearby data centre.

12 December 2021

The landslide forecast coming to you from space

The landslide forecast coming to you from space

Catching the breeze may bring you gold but sail too close to the wind and you’ll miss the boat. Combined with a sailor’s intuition meteorologist Sukanta Basu’s highly detailed wind forecast may well help the Dutch sailing team secure a win at the Olympics this year.

09 December 2021

TU Delft to help green the maritime sector with SH2IPDRIVE

TU Delft to help green the maritime sector with SH2IPDRIVE

Twenty-five companies and knowledge institutes in the maritime industry have joined forces in SH2IPDRIVE: Sustainable Hydrogen Integrated Propulsion Drives. In this innovation programme, they will work together to make hydrogen shipping a reality.

08 December 2021

New method predicts drug response of cancer patients

New method predicts drug response of cancer patients

Researchers from Delft University of Technology and the Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI) have developed an algorithm to predict patient response to anti-cancer drugs. This allows us to identify more rapidly if some drugs can have a positive effect on a specific patient, even for complicated medicines such as chemotherapies where response is typically hard to predict. This method is called TRANSACT and makes use of the wealth of data previously collected through research with cell lines.

03 December 2021

Grip or slip; robots need a human sense of touch

Grip or slip; robots need a human sense of touch

How can humans instantly estimate the slipperiness of a surface and adjust their gripping, for instance when picking up a wet glass? Researchers have demonstrated that a (radial) strain of the skin of the fingertip is involved in the perception of slipperiness during initial contact. Robotics could use this information, for instance to improve prosthetics and grippers. The results will be published in PNAS.

02 December 2021

Fitrim: Wheelchair power to the people

Fitrim: Wheelchair power to the people

Just imagine that you just drove your wheelchair for half an hour over bumpy roads and some grassy spots, only to have your fitbit or smartphone activity tracker inform you that you took only 50 steps, burned virtually no calories and that you shouldn’t be such a couch potato. ‘There has to be a better way,’ Marit van Dijk thought. A seed grant from Delft Health Initiative and the TU Delft Sports Engineering Institute makes the difference.

02 December 2021

Self-experimentation for long-lasting physical activity promotion in cardiac rehabilitation

Self-experimentation for long-lasting physical activity promotion in cardiac rehabilitation

A heart-attack may very well be the ultimate wake-up call when it comes to changing your lifestyle and behaviour. Even so, four years on most cardiac patients have relapsed to a very low fitness and physical activity level. Explorative self-experimentation, developed by Jos Kraal and colleagues, makes changing physical activity behaviour for cardiac patients more personal.

30 November 2021

Mud research requires multidisciplinary approach

Mud research requires multidisciplinary approach

Mudnet, the Delft-based multidisciplinary team consisting of marine and civil engineers researching the properties of mud, won the NWO ‘Team Science Award’ this week. The team was praised for using a great diversity of expertise in subject.

30 November 2021

The formation of kidney stones on a microscale

The formation of kidney stones on a microscale

Researchers from TU Delft developed a method to watch the formation of kidney stones on a microscale, in a so called microfluidic platform. By slightly adjusting the pH and the concentration of specific minerals, the formation could be slowed down or inhibited completely. The research is now published in Biomicrofluidics.

24 November 2021

TU Delft creates one of the world’s most precise microchip sensors – thanks to a spiderweb

TU Delft creates one of the world’s most precise microchip sensors – thanks to a spiderweb

A team of researchers from TU Delft managed to design one of the world’s most precise microchip sensors; the device can function at room temperature – a ‘holy grail’ for quantum technologies and sensing.

19 November 2021

Delft scientists put the spotlight on combined capture and conversion of CO2

Delft scientists put the spotlight on combined capture and conversion of CO2

CO2 can be electrochemically converted into valuable chemicals and fuels. Both capturing and converting CO2 do, however, require a lot of energy. An optimal combination of both processes can save a lot of energy and reduce the loss of materials. The TU Delft research group of David Vermaas recently published a paper in Nature Catalyses, summarising the various ideas on how to achieve this.

18 November 2021

The Best Tech Idea of 2021: processor and memory in one

The Best Tech Idea of 2021: processor and memory in one

Said Hamdioui's 'computation-in-memory' is the Best Tech Idea of 2021 according to the jury of KIJK magazine. The jury praised Said's computer architecture for making numerous new innovations possible: "the Internet of Things requires large amounts of computers that all must be very energy-efficient. Memristors can be the basis for this and that makes this idea, however young, very important."

17 November 2021

Delft Design alumnus Jerry de Vos wins James Dyson Award sustainability prize

Delft Design alumnus Jerry de Vos wins James Dyson Award sustainability prize

With his Plastic Scanner, Jerry de Vos has designed a handheld device that can tell you quickly what kind of plastic something is made of. Knowing this is crucial for better reuse and recycling of the growing worldwide plastic waste.