Biotechnology

Innovation is crucial to fulfil the potential of industrial biotechnology for sustainable production of fuels, chemicals, materials, food and feed. Similarly, scientific and technological advances in environmental biotechnology are needed to enable novel approaches to water purification, and ‘waste-to-product’ processes thus contributing to a circular economy. Increased fundamental knowledge encompassing enzymes, microorganisms and processes are essential for progress in this field. The Department of Biotechnology covers this research area and, based on new insights, selects, designs and tests new biobased catalysts, micro-organisms, and processes.

The department encompasses five research sections:

News

05 July 2018

Delft Advanced Biorenewables attracts capital and commercial director for scale-up phase

Serial entrepreneur Jan Willem Klerkx participates and joins start-up Delft Advanced Biorenewables (DAB), that developed a unique technology to produce biochemicals and biofuels in a cheaper and more efficient way. Klerkx becomes shareholder and joins the management. Details about the investment are not published. DAB , a spin-off of TU Delft, has gone through an extensive development trajectory in the last four years and is now in the phase of scaling up, in which Klerkx will play an important role. Using his knowledge and experience, the serial entrepreneur regularly joins technology start-ups to strengthen them in the field of management and sales. Previously, he invested in the start-up Scyfer (artificial intelligence), which was taken over by Qualcomm last year. With DAB, Klerkx now focuses on sustainable energy. "I had the idea for a while to spend my time and energy on supporting the circular economy. What DAB does - reducing the production costs of biofuels and biochemicals - is an important contribution to this. The technology and scientific team of DAB are world-class. I look forward to making the company stronger commercially with my experience." DAB Corporate Movie from DelftAB on Vimeo . Director of DAB, Kirsten Steinbusch, is pleased with the arrival of Klerkx. "Jan Willem has proven to be able to make a difference in knowledge based start-ups. We can use his commercial skills and strategy to enable DAB to grow further." TU Delft also has an interest in DAB through ‘ Delft Enterprises ’. Director Paul Althuis: "TU Delft is committed to work on a sustainable future. That is why it is important that our scientists’ groundbreaking research also reaches the market. That is why we invest in promising technological innovations, such as those of DAB." DAB was founded in 2012 with the conviction that in the near future there will be an increasing demand for advanced fuels and chemicals that are produced from biomass. To make biobased an attractive alternative, the production process should become cost effective and scalable. DAB has developed a unique separation and reactor technology to convert organic material into biofuels and biological chemicals in a single process step, resulting in both lower costs and simplified production. DAB works closely with TU Delft and the Bioprocess Pilot Facility (BPF) to scale up the technology. The joint research project is subsidized by the Ministry of Economic Affairs, national regulations for Ministry of Economic Affairs subsidies and the ‘Top Sector Energie’ carried out by the Dutch Enterprise Agency (RVO). For more information, please contact Kirsten Steinbusch - Managing Director DAB

News

15 January 2016

Algae prove promising candidates for biodiesel production via 'survival of the fattest'

Smart methods for cultivating algae bring the efficient production of biodiesel using algae in sight. On Tuesday 19 January, Peter Mooij will obtain his doctorate at TU Delft for his work on this subject. CO 2 neutral There is huge scientific interest in the use of microalgae to produce carbohydrates and in particular lipids (fats), as lipids from microalgae can be converted into biodiesel. The amount of CO 2 released by the combustion of this biodiesel is equal to the amount of CO 2 that was previously extracted from the atmosphere by the microalgae. Thus the use of biodiesel does not lead to an increase in CO 2 in the atmosphere. 'Microalgae offer two huge advantages over other biological oil production platforms', says doctoral candidate Peter Mooij from TU Delft. 'Firstly, after cultivation, microalgae can be made up relatively largely of lipids. And secondly, relatively little fresh water and agricultural land is required to cultivate microalgae.' Survival of the fattest Mooij uses a smart method to cultivate suitable algae that is economically viable for large-scale algae production: survival of the fattest. The fattest algae survive. 'In the reactor we give a competitive advantage to the algae with the required characteristics, in this case the production of carbohydrates and fats. We start with a collection of 'ordinary' algae. During the day we provide them with light and CO 2 . This is enough for them to produce oil, however they are unable to divide. They need nutrients for cell division and they are only given these in the dark. To absorb these nutrients, the algae need energy and carbon. This means that only the fattest algae can divide, as they have stored these during the day. By removing some of the algae every day, the culture will eventually exist of only the fattest algae.' Starch 'All of our experiments led to systems in which carbohydrates (starch) formed the primary energy storage compounds', continues Mooij. 'So we have found a suitable environment in which carbohydrate production by algae is rewarded.' Unfortunately this environment is not yet selective for the storage of fats. The culture environment needs to be made even more specific to achieve this. 'But a greater understanding of the ecological role of lipids and carbohydrates in microalgae clears the way for the creation of lipid-specific selective environments. Rewarding a microalga for showing the desired behaviour by using a selective environment, one of the central concepts in my research, will be shown to be a valuable approach once there is a better understanding of the ecological role of lipids.' More information For further information please contact Peter Mooij tel. +31 6 - 483 826 35 or p.r.mooij@tudelft.nl or Wendy Batist, press officer TU Delft via tel. +31 - 15 - 27 884 99 or g.m.batist@tudelft.nl . Please read Peter Mooij's blogs on Faces of Science (only in Dutch).
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